The Handloaders Bench Home
Home Search search Menu menu Not logged in - Login | Register

Welcome to HandloadersBench.com. Our mission here is to provide a place for those interested in the hobby of Reloading Ammunition. We offer a series of forums where they can ask questions, share answers, and highlight successes & failures so that others can learn. If you join our site please be aware that front porch rules apply. If you wouldn't say it on your front porch with grandma, your pastor and your 12 year old niece present it doesn't belong here. The Golden Rule applies. If you can live within those guidelines, Welcome Aboard! Spammers, trolls, and flamers will not last long here, your time would be better spent looking for a board where those traits are acceptable. HB Administration

Coyote predation and deer numbers
 Moderated by: The_Mountaineer Page:  First Page Previous Page  1  2   
 New Topic   Reply   Printer Friendly 
 Rate Topic 
AuthorPost
 Posted: Sat Dec 5th, 2009 05:25 PM
   PM  Quote  Reply 
21st Post
Ekwo
Junior Member
 

Joined: Sat Dec 5th, 2009
Location: Canada
Posts: 19
Photo: 
Are you a handloader?: Yes
Favorite type of cartridge to load?: rifle
My favorite chambering is:: .30-06
Status: 
Offline

  back to top

Coyotes do a lot of damage where I live and I have watched them take mature deer down right in our yard. Some winters the snow conditions make things just perfect for coyotes to run on the crust while deer break through. It becomes a slaughter, especially when they pack up. I have seen as many as 7 in a pack and our coyotes are not small dogs.

Coyotes take a lot of fawns, but we also have wolves, black bears and cougar chowing down on the deer. The black bears here do take quite a few fawns but I know they have a big impact on the survival rates of the elk and moose calves.

In the old days when coyote skins were worth something it was not too bad, Now the fur prices are so far in the toilet that no one can be bothered and even the recreational shooters have to weigh the cost of fuel and a weekend out against what they get out of it. The weekend shooters have become few and far between.



 Posted: Sun Dec 6th, 2009 04:52 PM
   PM  Quote  Reply 
22nd Post
Paul B
Master Handloader
 

Joined: Sun Sep 30th, 2007
Location:  
Posts: 6082
Photo: 
Are you a handloader?: Yes
Favorite type of cartridge to load?: I load everything!
My favorite chambering is:: 
Status: 
Offline

  back to top

Slim said, " I wonder if we should trap some of our grizz and let 'em loose in the Hollywood Hills - and the wine country. We should do what we can to restore the grizzly to California as a thank-you gesture for all their help getting us a huntable wolf population."

 

I like the way you think. :cool::thumbs:

About 30 years ago when I lived in Northern Nevada, Winnemucca to be eact, I had premission to go on several private rnches to hunt coyotes, especially in the Paradise Valley area. The climate there during most years allow cattle to breed and have calves all years round. In the winter, when game is scare, if a pack of yotes finds a cow birthing a calf, they'll literally eat the calf as it fast as the cow is pushing it out.

The ranchers would pay me $15 for every yote I killed and I could sell the hides which at that time were going as high as $100 a pelt for really prime skins.  Btween selling yote hides and shooting jack rabbits for trappers that want them for bait, I made enough money during the winter of 78/79 to pay cash for a brand new Ford F-150 4X4. :cool:

A few years back, I was sitting on a stand up in the Kaibab National Forest overlooking a water hole when the most beautifully pelted pair of yotes showed up, cavorting and playing like a couple of teen age lovers. That was a coiple of the nicest pelt I'd ever seen and as I watched them through my binoculars, I noticed something did not seem right. I'm thinking should I shoot them or let them be? :confused: Hide were not selling for anything at the time and a little voice in the back of my head said to not shoot. They kind of moved toward me as the wind was in my favor and when they got close enough that I could tell, I realized that this was a mating pair of the Mexican wolf that was reintroduced into Arizona and I'd have been in deep kim-chi if I'd shot them. That explained the rather lack of deer sign in the area. later on that hunt, some of those wolves killed a cow not too far from our camp and the sounds of agony that came from that cow will haunt me forever. maybe I should have shot them after all. I dunno. A stretch in the federal Graybar Hotel didn't sound too appealling.

I feel that the reason the ecofreaks want wolves and other pedators reintroduced is to drastically reduce the game population to a point that hunting of any type will no longer be feasable. No more hunting means we no longer need guns to hunt. Win win solution for those who wish to disarm us. :sad:

Paul B.



 Posted: Sat Jan 16th, 2010 01:23 AM
   PM  Quote  Reply 
23rd Post
joew
Full Member


Joined: Fri Jan 15th, 2010
Location: Solon, Iowa USA
Posts: 100
Photo: [Download]
Are you a handloader?: Yes
Favorite type of cartridge to load?: rifle
My favorite chambering is:: 270 win ...
Status: 
Offline

  back to top

we have alot of them in iowa,around my place deer and dogs are not hard to come by, we have not seen much impact on them reducing our deer herds, but they have plenty of food, they hurt the pheasant population



 Posted: Mon Jan 18th, 2010 01:59 PM
   PM  Quote  Reply 
24th Post
Timberghozt



Joined: Fri Feb 11th, 2005
Location: Texas USA
Posts: 7089
Photo: [Download]
Are you a handloader?: Yes
Favorite type of cartridge to load?: I load everything!
My favorite chambering is:: 300 Winchester Magnum ...
Status: 
Offline

  back to top

Its been a hard year on me work wise.On an average year I was killing 50 plus dogs just light hunting and the years I really went hard I`d kill 80-100 plus dogs a year.
I am running out of spots to hunt anymore though.Everyone is into predator hunting now.
There was a time 20 years ago when I was thought "stupid" for choosing to be out talking to song dogs when I could be shootin wall hanger bucks.
Nothing gets me excited like a dog coming full bore to my mouth calls only to realize at that last second..
"OOOOOOOOOOOPPPPPPPSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSS" LOLOL



____________________
"He who fights with monsters might take care, lest he thereby become a monster; For if you gaze for long into an abyss, the abyss gazes also into you." - F.Nietzche


 Posted: Mon Jan 18th, 2010 03:43 PM
   PM  Quote  Reply 
25th Post
lynxpilot
Full Member


Joined: Sat Jun 13th, 2009
Location: Ava, Missouri USA
Posts: 201
Photo: 
Are you a handloader?: Yes
Favorite type of cartridge to load?: I load everything!
My favorite chambering is:: 50 BMG
Status: 
Offline

  back to top

I hope they're bad, because when I shot one a few months ago it was the most exhilarating shot I ever took. Recently bought a really nice night scope and gave it a permanent home on top of my AR-10 clone. Nice thing is that the scope, if no fog or rain, is darn near good out to the maximum useful range of the .308.



____________________
Save our Constitution.


 Posted: Sun Jan 24th, 2010 06:16 AM
   PM  Quote  Reply 
26th Post
sako06

 

Joined: Sun Jul 22nd, 2007
Location: California USA
Posts: 920
Photo: 
Are you a handloader?: Yes
Favorite type of cartridge to load?: I load everything!
My favorite chambering is:: 
Status: 
Offline

  back to top

Out here on the left side about 2 weeks ago deputies killed 2 mtn lions in the city of Yucaipa,one was in a residential neighborhood killing dogs and cats & was observed stalking children.The other was in a residential neighborhood getting to darn familiar(you should've read the comments by the groups we have who post signs to learn to live at peace with our wild animal neighbors)One idiot wrote in that the lions should've been tranquilized and relocated obviously the lady knows zip about wildlife behavior.out here the huggers pushed to protect them state ruled in their favor so there are no mtn lion controls,these cats stay in this area btw we're in the foothills of the san bernardino mtns with bobcats(had 6 in our yard last summer)coyotes,foxes,badgers,skunks,opossum,rattlers,mtn lions,black bear,feral( felis domestica) cats.



 Posted: Sun Apr 21st, 2013 08:07 AM
   PM  Quote  Reply 
27th Post
WhiteWolf
Junior Member
 

Joined: Thu Apr 4th, 2013
Location:  
Posts: 5
Photo: 
Are you a handloader?: Yes
Favorite type of cartridge to load?: rifle
My favorite chambering is:: bolt action
Status: 
Offline

  back to top

Has anyone hunted coyote and killed one and then got another one the same day same place? If so did you remove the body of the first one? Tips and tricks are always welcome!



 Posted: Sun Apr 21st, 2013 03:32 PM
   PM  Quote  Reply 
28th Post
Paul B
Master Handloader
 

Joined: Sun Sep 30th, 2007
Location:  
Posts: 6082
Photo: 
Are you a handloader?: Yes
Favorite type of cartridge to load?: I load everything!
My favorite chambering is:: 
Status: 
Offline

  back to top

ne time while living in Nevada, my hunting partner and I were caling coyotes for their hides and I had three all coming in like they hadn't eaten in days. My buddy who was watching my back thought I was shooting a full auto gun and I nailed all three before they got out of that field. Could I ever do that again? I dunno but it sure did get the old ticker going at full throttle. Talk about a rush.
Paul B.



 Posted: Tue May 14th, 2013 07:17 PM
   PM  Quote  Reply 
29th Post
rhythmtech
Full Member
 

Joined: Sun Mar 31st, 2013
Location: St. Louis, Missouri USA
Posts: 58
Photo: [Download]
Are you a handloader?: Yes
Favorite type of cartridge to load?: I load everything!
My favorite chambering is:: 10mm & .357
Status: 
Offline

  back to top

Reading through this thread I just got curious. What kind of damage do coyotes cause?  Aren't coyotes a native species?



 Posted: Tue May 14th, 2013 08:05 PM
   PM  Quote  Reply 
30th Post
Plainsman
Super Moderator


Joined: Mon Sep 3rd, 2007
Location: High Plains
Posts: 12597
Photo: [Download]
Are you a handloader?: Yes
Favorite type of cartridge to load?: I load everything!
My favorite chambering is:: How can I choose?
Status: 
Offline

  back to top

Coyotes are indeed a "native species," but that doesn't mean they don't cause harm.

In ranch country they will pray on newborn calves and even the mother if she has been weakened by the birthing. A cow wandering away from the main herd to calf is in danger. Some wildlife "experts" say that coyotes are solitary hunters and do not pack-up. This is not so. They definitely DO pack up, especially during calving season.

In urban and suburban areas, once they have lost their fear of man (definitely not the case out here!) they become a danger to cats, small dogs, little children. They may be a "native species" and we may not be, but we're here now and have to make the best of it.



____________________
Homo sapiens, [ˈhōmō ˈsāpēənz] Noun. An advanced primate characterized by a large brain which it seldom uses.


 Posted: Tue May 14th, 2013 08:23 PM
   PM  Quote  Reply 
31st Post
rhythmtech
Full Member
 

Joined: Sun Mar 31st, 2013
Location: St. Louis, Missouri USA
Posts: 58
Photo: [Download]
Are you a handloader?: Yes
Favorite type of cartridge to load?: I load everything!
My favorite chambering is:: 10mm & .357
Status: 
Offline

  back to top

Plainsman wrote: Coyotes are indeed a "native species," but that doesn't mean they don't cause harm.

In ranch country they will pray on newborn calves and even the mother if she has been weakened by the birthing. A cow wandering away from the main herd to calf is in danger. Some wildlife "experts" say that coyotes are solitary hunters and do not pack-up. This is not so. They definitely DO pack up, especially during calving season.

In urban and suburban areas, once they have lost their fear of man (definitely not the case out here!) they become a danger to cats, small dogs, little children. They may be a "native species" and we may not be, but we're here now and have to make the best of it.

Brief and informative, excellent reply thanks. :thumbs: My intent with the native species part of the question is mostly to figure out how they are out of balance. It seems there are plenty of coyotes here in Missouri, but I have never really heard much of them being a problem. Over the last 100 years I am not really sure what would have put them in check here since it hasn't been until recently that there have been any numbers of large predators. Anyhow, I am just curious how they fit in to the wildlife picture.

I have been wanting to go coyote hunting for a long time, but haven't really made moves towards it. Anybody have a tutorial handy? My immediate family aren't hunters so I haven't been able to get the typical "hunters education."


Last edited on Tue May 14th, 2013 08:26 PM by rhythmtech



 Posted: Thu Jan 19th, 2017 02:09 PM
   PM  Quote  Reply 
32nd Post
Tgriffith
Junior Member


Joined: Fri Jan 13th, 2017
Location: Whitwell, Tennessee USA
Posts: 7
Photo: 
Are you a handloader?: Yes
Favorite type of cartridge to load?: I load everything!
My favorite chambering is:: 10mm auto
Status: 
Offline

  back to top

I believe coyotes impact on game animals vary depending on what part of the country you're in. They are a non native species in Tennessee and they most definitely have an impact on our deer herd as well as turkey,quail etc. The University of Georgia did an extensive study on fawn mortality ugadeerresearch.org

Last edited on Thu Jan 19th, 2017 02:36 PM by Tgriffith



 Posted: Thu Jan 19th, 2017 09:00 PM
   PM  Quote  Reply 
33rd Post
TexasBear
Full Member
 

Joined: Thu May 28th, 2015
Location: Palestine, Texas USA
Posts: 154
Photo: 
Are you a handloader?: Yes
Favorite type of cartridge to load?: rifle
My favorite chambering is:: 30-06, 243
Status: 
Offline

  back to top

Here where I live in East Texas the coyotes are doing a number on our deer, the sad part is we have a group of hunters that will not kill a coyote. But lets be fair they will kill a doe and bitch about no deer. There has been a study done on herd growth due to predator control and they stated that without control on predators there a drop in growth and said coyotes were eating one to two fawns a week. Where there was control the herd grew about 40 percent so control is the key. I trapped and killed 6 coyotes one spring and by fall they had bee replaced the way to deal with it is if you see a coyote you kill it if you want deer and small game. Bobcats can wipe out your turkey and quail along with the help of the fox.
Now to be open and fair to the predators there is one critter out there that can wipe a whole herd in a very short time and he walks on two legs. Keep your gates lock and your property posted and cameras up and running. If there isn't any bones and you don't have a big foot then someone or something is caring them off. Poachers, coyotes, bobcats, fox and coon can mess with what critters you have on your place. Start with solving the two legged then watch your game cameras and walk the woods and look for sign. Minerals and salt and food plots off season is a big help to keep deer around if you a large section of land mark off a no go zone for no or low pressure zones.
If you want to help your deer population to grow skip a year or two of hunting deer and work on the predators and poachers. Lock up poachers up and make sure everyone knows who the poachers are.



 Posted: Mon Jan 23rd, 2017 01:52 AM
   PM  Quote  Reply 
34th Post
Irish Bird Dog
Senior Member


Joined: Mon Apr 6th, 2009
Location: Wisconsin USA
Posts: 1577
Photo: 
Are you a handloader?: Yes
Favorite type of cartridge to load?: I load everything!
My favorite chambering is:: .45 COLT
Status: 
Offline

  back to top

Timberghozt wrote:
Are there any factual studies on how many deer coyotes will kill a year and if they make an impact on deer herds?I ask because my uncle who owns a large area of land in the mountains of Virginia has told me he has seen much less in the way of new born fawns over the years as coyote numbers have moved eastward.I know they must kill some of the unlucky young and sick and old deer but I am really interested to see if they make a huge impact on deer herd numbers.


Gene, try this link for some info on coyotes vs deer, either click on it or copy/paste...one should work.

https://www.americanhunter.org/articles/2016/12/26/how-much-do-coyotes-affect-deer-populations/?utm_source=newsletter&utm_medium=insider&utm_campaign=0117



____________________
NRA Life Endowment Member
WDNR Hunter Safety Instructor
NRA Home Safety Firearm Instructor and Pistol


 Posted: Mon Jan 23rd, 2017 03:18 PM
   PM  Quote  Reply 
35th Post
wildlifeguy
Junior Member
 

Joined: Thu Jan 5th, 2017
Location:  
Posts: 13
Photo: 
Are you a handloader?: Yes
Favorite type of cartridge to load?: I load everything!
My favorite chambering is:: no favorite
Status: 
Offline

  back to top

Sorry, didn't read through all of the responses to this one. Coyotes can definitely suppress deer numbers. In most areas it's not that much of an issue. Maintaining good fawn cover (dense grass) can help. I have heard that it is a big issue in some of the eastern states and there are some research studies on-going addressing this. One in particular I saw presented at a conference last year showed that even after a seemingly obscene number of coyotes were removed, they returned to previous numbers very quickly. Another study in Texas indicated that you would need to remove over 70% of the coyote population each year to make any difference in numbers. Coyotes tend to regulate breeding activity based on numbers. If the population starts to decline, they produce more pups. Therefore, the more you remove, the faster the remaining ones try to replensish numbers. I don't promote extirpation of predators unless it can be confirmed that they are causing issues



 Current time is 06:15 AMPage:  First Page Previous Page  1  2   
Top




UltraBB 1.17 Copyright © 2007-2008 Data 1 Systems
Page processed in 0.1891 seconds (19% database + 81% PHP). 29 queries executed.