The Handloaders Bench Home
Home Search search Menu menu Not logged in - Login | Register

Welcome to HandloadersBench.com. You will receive a activation email with a link in it to activate your account. If you don't receive the email check your spam or junk folders. Email servers look at our email as spam. Our mission here is to provide a place for those interested in the hobby of Reloading Ammunition. We offer a series of forums where they can ask questions, share answers, and highlight successes & failures so that others can learn. If you join our site please be aware that front porch rules apply. If you wouldn't say it on your front porch with grandma, your pastor and your 12 year old niece present it doesn't belong here. The Golden Rule applies. If you can live within those guidelines, Welcome Aboard! Spammers, trolls, and flamers will not last long here, your time would be better spent looking for a board where those traits are acceptable. HB Administration

Case Head Separation Question
 Moderated by: Slingshot, Rockydog, klallen, DesertMarine, -6 Page:    1  2  Next Page Last Page  
 New Topic   Reply   Printer Friendly 
 Rate Topic 
AuthorPost
 Posted: Tue Feb 21st, 2017 02:10 AM
   PM  Quote  Reply 
1st Post
cjmcnix
Full Member


Joined: Tue Sep 27th, 2016
Location: Middletown, New Jersey USA
Posts: 64
Photo: [Download]
Are you a handloader?: Yes
Favorite type of cartridge to load?: I load everything!
My favorite chambering is:: 270 win, 6.5 Dutch, 223 Rem, 44 Mag, 45 ACP, ... ...
Status: 
Offline

  back to top

I have a question about case head separation on a couple of my handloads; why would it have happened, what should I look for in the future, and is it preventable?

At this point, I have to give you all the facts...

I am talking about .303 British that has been formed into 6.5 x 53R Dutch. When the rifle was handed down to me, the only source of ammunition available to me was from a prolific handloader, blogger and author located in Apache Junction, Arizona. Once I fired off a batch, I would send them back to him (along with a money order) to have them reloaded (I don't know if they were reloaded or if he just sent another batch he had on hand). I started with around 60 cartridges. After the first reloads came back, I lost about 5 or 6 to neck splits. I have no idea how old these cases may have been or how many times they were reloaded before I got them.

At this point, I decided to shelve the remaining cases and learn to reload myself. A couple of weeks ago, I got my final dies in. I neck sized the 50 (or so) old cases, and created my own 150 cases with brand new .303 British brass. All are loaded with 160 grain Hornady round nose bullets and 38 grains of Accurate 4350.

I went to the range this morning and fired off around 100 cartridges, evenly split as 50 of mine and 50 of the older ones. ALL of the cases show wear marks except near the bottom of the case. Unfortunately, 4 of the older cases show case separation cracks.

Is this just a fact of life for reloaded cases or is there something off with my load and/or rifle? Are the wear marks normal on a rifle case?

I've added some pictures here: Case Head Separation
http://imgur.com/a/7BxMp


Thanks!

Attachment: 20170220_212611.jpg (Downloaded 139 times)



 Posted: Tue Feb 21st, 2017 02:18 AM
   PM  Quote  Reply 
2nd Post
griff411
Full Member
 

Joined: Tue Oct 19th, 2010
Location:  
Posts: 69
Photo: 
Are you a handloader?: Yes
Favorite type of cartridge to load?: I load everything!
My favorite chambering is:: 44 WCF
Status: 
Offline

  back to top

May we assume that this is a Lee Enfield rifle? There are things that can be done to mitigate against this, but case separations are typical with those rifles. Do a search here for many discussions on that topic. The good news is that it is not as typical for most other guns.

Griff



 Posted: Tue Feb 21st, 2017 02:29 AM
   PM  Quote  Reply 
3rd Post
swampratt
Senior Member


Joined: Mon Nov 30th, 2009
Location: Yukon, Oklahoma USA
Posts: 4505
Photo: [Download]
Are you a handloader?: Yes
Favorite type of cartridge to load?: rifle
My favorite chambering is:: .308 win.
Status: 
Offline

  back to top

You need to measure how far the shoulder ogive is being pushed back.
Place a 40 S&W case open end down over the open end of the 303(6.5x53R) on the shot case that is still good.

Then measure the OAL of both the cases together.
Then resize the case.
Measure OAL again...
If you Full length size and push the shoulder back say .008" that will lead to failure withing a few reloads say 8 or so.

Found that out with my .308. got case head separation.

Push them back .001" or less and 18 reloads were the norm for the winchester cases.
I got 40+ reloads from other brands in .308.

Old cases like you stated could be very work hardened or may have been reloaded many times.

You can actually cut the case at the crack and measure thickness of the case and compare it to a new good case or say some old stock that was never fired.

Of course you will need to sacrifice a good case.

I did this with my .308 and it got remarkably thinner than stock case.

Good job reloading your own.. You could have been sold some cases with a slight crack in them to begin with.

You can take a paper clip and bend the end so that you make a pick sort of.. insert it into the case mouth and run it down through the case and try and feel for a crack.

You will feel it..Do it with the ones in the picture so you know what to feel for.
You will usually feel a slight split before you see it.

Then you will begin to notice a faint line trying to appear in that area when a crack begins to form.

I have shot .308 cases 2 times with a case head crack and they still look better than the cases in your picture.

But then You also have an issue with it could be your guns chamber is just really long and large.

In this case you can modify your die so you do not size the case so much if you do Full length size.



 Posted: Tue Feb 21st, 2017 03:31 AM
   PM  Quote  Reply 
4th Post
Rockydog



Joined: Tue Jul 26th, 2005
Location: 160 Miles SW Of The Frozen Tundra, Wisconsin USA
Posts: 15196
Photo: 
Are you a handloader?: Yes
Favorite type of cartridge to load?: I load everything!
My favorite chambering is:: 8mm Mauser
Status: 
Offline

  back to top

Swampratt has this right. You need to size reloaded rimmed cases so that they headspace on the shoulder not on the rim.

If the bolt face on that old girl has slop between the cartridge rim and the bolt face, the blow from the firing pin can push the case forward until the rim hits the back of the chamber. As the pressure builds on the case walls the case walls expand and grip the walls of the chamber. Because the case head is solid it does not expand to grip the case walls. Instead the head is driven backward until it contacts the bolt face. This stretches the brass right where you are seeing the case separation lines. So you resize the case and set the shoulder back and do it all over again. Eventually it stretches to the separation point.

The cure for this is to set up your dies in a manner that the shoulder contacts the chamber tightly enough that it barely lets you close the bolt. Now the firing pin cannot push the case away from the case head upon firing, so there is no place for the brass to stretch to.

Because you are forming these from .303 you should easily be able to back your die out to the point where the 303 cal neck (actually .311-.314) will form a false shoulder on the neck that will hold the case head tightly against the bolt face.

Perhaps this is a better explanation:

http://www.hornady.com/ballistics-resource/internal

Read this a couple of times and it will begin to make sense. You are asking the right questions. It's fairly easy to fix.



____________________
“Those that beat their rifles into plow shares will plow for those who didn’t”. Jefferson

Light hunting rifles; Gravity is permanent, recoil is temporary.Your Choice


 Posted: Tue Feb 21st, 2017 04:10 AM
   PM  Quote  Reply 
5th Post
griff411
Full Member
 

Joined: Tue Oct 19th, 2010
Location:  
Posts: 69
Photo: 
Are you a handloader?: Yes
Favorite type of cartridge to load?: I load everything!
My favorite chambering is:: 44 WCF
Status: 
Offline

  back to top

That's what I get for reading too quickly. Listen to the other guys, not me. Sorry.

Griff



 Posted: Tue Feb 21st, 2017 04:12 AM
   PM  Quote  Reply 
6th Post
runfiverun
Senior Member
 

Joined: Sat Feb 9th, 2008
Location: Soda Springs, Idaho USA
Posts: 3888
Photo: 
Are you a handloader?: Yes
Favorite type of cartridge to load?: I load everything!
My favorite chambering is:: 
Status: 
Offline

  back to top

rocky explained it pretty well.

basically what your gonna do to stop this is headspace off the shoulder and not the rim.
this keeps the case from stretching and cracking.

when you make your ammo the first time you have to start long then keep turning the die in about 1/8 a turn at a time until they just chamber.
then turn it in again another 1/8 turn and lock it down.
then break it free from the press.
now your die is set to your rifle.
you'll work a piece of brass pretty hard doing the same one over and over setting the die so use a few different pieces then re-size the first ones.

now that you have them made.
you'll want to just neck size them for 3-4 firings then anneal and full length size them.



 Posted: Tue Feb 21st, 2017 09:00 AM
   PM  Quote  Reply 
7th Post
9.3X75R
Senior Member
 

Joined: Mon Oct 7th, 2013
Location: In The Sticks, Missouri USA
Posts: 1340
Photo: 
Are you a handloader?: Yes
Favorite type of cartridge to load?: I load everything!
My favorite chambering is:: I can't pick just one
Status: 
Offline

  back to top

Rocky and run nailed it. I suppose everyone has a name for it but we always called it "setting a false shoulder". I've had to do it on several old rifles and the results are always fine and final. Once fireformed to the chamber of your rifle just neck size and the brass should give normal life and no more separations.



____________________
"Professing themselves to be wise, they became fools". Romans 1:22

"Those who fail to study history are condemned to repeat it"

NRA Benefactor,


 Posted: Tue Feb 21st, 2017 11:35 AM
   PM  Quote  Reply 
8th Post
Damannoyed
Full Member
 

Joined: Wed Sep 7th, 2016
Location:  
Posts: 802
Photo: 
Are you a handloader?: Yes
Favorite type of cartridge to load?: I load everything!
My favorite chambering is:: .45 Auto
Status: 
Offline

  back to top

Yep,, pretty covered it,

Last thing that really needs checked is the gun's headspace.

The cases should not have the kind of room between the breechface and the bolt face on a rimmed case to drive the case head backwards that far under firing pressures.

It SHOULDN"T happen,,, but if the gun's headspacing is "loose" as Rocky noted,,,,, this is what you get.



 Posted: Tue Feb 21st, 2017 02:49 PM
   PM  Quote  Reply 
9th Post
Charley



Joined: Fri Sep 9th, 2005
Location: San Antonio, Texas USA
Posts: 15648
Photo: 
Are you a handloader?: Yes
Favorite type of cartridge to load?: I load everything!
My favorite chambering is:: all of them
Status: 
Offline

  back to top

Not neccsarily "loose", as far as the chamber. The military wasn't planning on reloading those cases. Worked fine for their purposes. Your needs are different, and sizing to the chamber is a must, if you want to be able to reload those cases. RD and Run know what they are speaking of, I'd listen to their suggestions.



____________________
"The fact that guns can kill another human being is the whole point. That's why they are so darn good at deterring violent criminals". Ann Coulter


 Posted: Tue Feb 21st, 2017 03:42 PM
   PM  Quote  Reply 
10th Post
Big Joe
Forum Benefactor


Joined: Thu Jul 4th, 2013
Location: Oklahoma USA
Posts: 578
Photo: 
Are you a handloader?: Yes
Favorite type of cartridge to load?: I load everything!
My favorite chambering is:: 222 and 308 in rifles 44mag and 45acp in handguns ...
Status: 
Offline

  back to top

I do not have a 303, but my brother has had them since we were young. Our uncle "taught" him how to set the brass to the chamber. He uses a small thin O ring next to the rim and when you close the bolt you can feel the head press against the bolt. When you fire it, it forms to that chamber. He and my uncle worked to set his dies up to his rifle at the time. Works for him, he now owns several rifles and each has its own set of dies set to that rifle. I think he has lost maybe 4-5 cases to separation over the years. He usually make his brass from new stuff but we have occasionally done it with pickups from the range.
I have a 30-30 I have to use same method on - some "goob" :123: cut the chamber long and didn't have the money to have the barrel set back and recut. It ended up being a great shooter so it will never leave the family. All the carts for that rifle are marked so there are no mix-ups. But same principal, small O ring and standard load keep brass separate from others and I'm good. So it's better understood the O ring is used only on the first firing.



 Posted: Tue Feb 21st, 2017 05:28 PM
   PM  Quote  Reply 
11th Post
cjmcnix
Full Member


Joined: Tue Sep 27th, 2016
Location: Middletown, New Jersey USA
Posts: 64
Photo: [Download]
Are you a handloader?: Yes
Favorite type of cartridge to load?: I load everything!
My favorite chambering is:: 270 win, 6.5 Dutch, 223 Rem, 44 Mag, 45 ACP, ... ...
Status: 
Offline

  back to top

I'm still new to this, so please bear with me if I sound completely ignorant...

I read up a bit and I understand how and why the case separations happened. What I'm still trying to figure out is how to verify that issue and how to compensate for it.

All of my .303 has been formed and sized, so can I assume it's too late for me to leave them a "bit long"? Is there anything I can do with my already fired cases to preserve them? At this point, I would normally do a neck resize without touching the shoulder.. is that enough?

I can see that finding a Go/No-Go gauge for an obsolete 6.5x53R Dutch M1895 is not going to happen... are there any "Bubba" methods I can use to see how bad the excess headspace might be?



 Posted: Tue Feb 21st, 2017 07:54 PM
   PM  Quote  Reply 
12th Post
Big Joe
Forum Benefactor


Joined: Thu Jul 4th, 2013
Location: Oklahoma USA
Posts: 578
Photo: 
Are you a handloader?: Yes
Favorite type of cartridge to load?: I load everything!
My favorite chambering is:: 222 and 308 in rifles 44mag and 45acp in handguns ...
Status: 
Offline

  back to top

The O ring trick may work but if they are already sized to your chamber may need to do the bent paperclip method to check for others that are about to expire.
Method: take a paperclip and straighten the outer wire section, on large ones just to the second loop should work, small ones go to the third loop. I leave the leftover as a small handle if you will. I then take a small file and put a point on the end. Then bend just an 1/8in 90 degrees and that is the "feeler" part. Run the feeler end in and bring back along the outside wall of the case in most cases there is no "snag" but on ones with weakened walls you can feel an odd dip or snag. Those are about to fail as well. If only the older ones failed first test fire I would check them period.
I have had 30-30 show signs and then find up to 20% in my old cases, I just crush and retire them.
I have blown one part and getting the forward part out is a dog. But If it ever happens Cerosafe is your friend. Plug barrel about 1/2in in from end of neck fill with Cerosafe, let harden and knock it out from the muzzle with solid rod with tape rings every so often (so you don't score the rifling) and a small hammer. It has worked for me on a lever gun and I didn't even pull the barrel. I have read several posts here where guys did same thing.



 Posted: Tue Feb 21st, 2017 09:53 PM
   PM  Quote  Reply 
13th Post
HighBC
Full Member
 

Joined: Tue Jun 21st, 2016
Location: USA
Posts: 736
Photo: 
Are you a handloader?: Yes
Favorite type of cartridge to load?: I load everything!
My favorite chambering is:: 7mm RM
Status: 
Offline

  back to top

I don't know if this would work with a rimmed case, but this is something I've done before with rimless and belted brass, but I haven't tried it with a rimmed bottle neck.

I use small pieces of feeler gauge .001" & .002", cut them so they fit in the bolt face. Chamber the brass, if the bolt closes with normal resistance add another slice of feeler gauge and continue doing so until you can feel resistance. Add up the feeler gauge slices and that's the amount of cartridge to chamber slop with those pieces of brass. Once I knew the amount of tolerance, I then use the .40 cal or 9mm piece of brass to measure head to datum line, add in the feeler gauge and I know how far to bump the shoulders for a proper chamber fit.

Not very scientific, but it's been a revealing technique for many years.

Back in my early beginnings I experienced a good number of case head separations, none that completely let go, but definitely on the brink. As I grew into this hobby I learned that one must know chamber dimensions in relation to brass fit.

HBC



 Posted: Wed Feb 22nd, 2017 12:14 AM
   PM  Quote  Reply 
14th Post
cjmcnix
Full Member


Joined: Tue Sep 27th, 2016
Location: Middletown, New Jersey USA
Posts: 64
Photo: [Download]
Are you a handloader?: Yes
Favorite type of cartridge to load?: I load everything!
My favorite chambering is:: 270 win, 6.5 Dutch, 223 Rem, 44 Mag, 45 ACP, ... ...
Status: 
Offline

  back to top

Big Joe wrote: The O ring trick may work but if they are already sized to your chamber may need to do the bent paperclip method to check for others that are about to expire.
I'm a bit unclear as to why I would use the o ring trick. Is that a method to reduce the amount of stretch on the first firing? So on the second firing, the brass would stretch again but less than if it was done all at once?



 Posted: Wed Feb 22nd, 2017 12:22 AM
   PM  Quote  Reply 
15th Post
cjmcnix
Full Member


Joined: Tue Sep 27th, 2016
Location: Middletown, New Jersey USA
Posts: 64
Photo: [Download]
Are you a handloader?: Yes
Favorite type of cartridge to load?: I load everything!
My favorite chambering is:: 270 win, 6.5 Dutch, 223 Rem, 44 Mag, 45 ACP, ... ...
Status: 
Offline

  back to top

HighBC wrote: I use small pieces of feeler gauge .001" & .002", cut them so they fit in the bolt face
I'm not sure if I'm doing it right, and heaven knows I have no idea what to do with the data, but I used your feeler gauge method and determined the following:

On a new unfired case (loaded round): At .006, the bolt would not close. At .005, it was a bit snug for my liking. I was comfortable with resistance at .004.

On a first fired case: At .004, the bolt closed but felt very tight. I was most comfortable with closing the bolt on .002.

Is what I measured a "normal" spread between unfired/fired cases?

I've seen reference now twice to using a .40 or 9mm case to measure something.. but I don't know what I am looking for to measure. I don't have any .40, but I have fired, unsized 9mm. All that seemed to do was rock back and forth a bit on my 6.5 shoulder.

Last edited on Wed Feb 22nd, 2017 12:23 AM by cjmcnix



 Posted: Wed Feb 22nd, 2017 01:18 AM
   PM  Quote  Reply 
16th Post
Rockydog



Joined: Tue Jul 26th, 2005
Location: 160 Miles SW Of The Frozen Tundra, Wisconsin USA
Posts: 15196
Photo: 
Are you a handloader?: Yes
Favorite type of cartridge to load?: I load everything!
My favorite chambering is:: 8mm Mauser
Status: 
Offline

  back to top

cjmcnix wrote:
Big Joe wrote: The O ring trick may work but if they are already sized to your chamber may need to do the bent paperclip method to check for others that are about to expire.
I'm a bit unclear as to why I would use the o ring trick. Is that a method to reduce the amount of stretch on the first firing? So on the second firing, the brass would stretch again but less than if it was done all at once?


cjmcnix, I suspect that you cases formed by some one else were made to fit military specs for the 6.5x 53 Dutch as Charley stated. They are bound for failure. Cases you made may be another whole matter and could very well be fairly close to where they need to be.

Even if they are stretched a bit by the first firing, if you can stop the stretching you may get a few more reloads out of them. Obviously, it would be better if they hadn't stretched at all.

There are three ways to do this but they all will accomplish the same goal. That goal is to keep the back end of the case as tight as you can get it to the bolt face and keep it there upon firing. As I said, we can do that in three ways with RIMMED cases. Cases with out rims cannot use Big Joe's method.

1. Use Big Joe's method. Load a cartridge with your favorite load Slip a very thin O ring, or even a thin rubber band used for orthodntic braces, over the case and roll it down to the rim. Insert the case and try to close the bolt. It should fit very snuggly. This will keep the firing pin from pushing the case forward away from the bolt face when it strikes the primer. Then, when the round goes off, it will expand the shoulder forward to fit the chamber instead of pushing the base back to the bolt face.

2. Load a round with a slightly reduced load from your normal load. Seat a bullet very long so that it jams into the lands of the rifle, preventing the bolt from closing. Turn the seating stem in a bit at a time until you can just barely get the rifle closed with the bullet jammed into the lands. This will hold the case tightly against the bolt face when the firing pin hits the primer. Disadvantage is that your bullets will probably not hit your usual point of aim. If you are using these as practice rounds it's kind of a waste of bullets.

3a. On initial sizing with this cartridge/parent case combo you need to back your die off until the bolt barely closes. Most likely you are pushing the shoulder too far back. Forget all about how the die manufacturer tells you to set them. Set them to fit the rifle, bolt face to shoulder. Load these with your favorite load. Preserve the die setting by measuring the distance between the shell holder and the reloading die with a feeler gauge. Write that measurement and the gun serial number in the die box with a Sharpie. Dedicate that shellholder to this die set. To lose it is to start over.

3b. If these have already been fired once run the 6.5 neck back over 7mm or 30 caliber expander ball. Using the same technique in 3a, back the die out a couple of turns and size down until you can barely seat the round. this will leave a very small 7mm or 30 cal. donut right at the base of the neck that will keep the base of the case tight against the bolt face. Load with your favorite load and blaze away. This will blow the shoulder forward rather than allow the case head to move away.


Some tips:
A sizing die moves in or out .0714 per full turn. (14 Threads per inch or 1 divided by 14.)

1 full turn = .0714
1/4 turn = .01786
1/8 turn =.00893
1/16 turn = .00446

An RCBS Seating die with 1/4 X 28 threads per inch moves in or out.

1 full turn =.0357
1/4 turn = .00893
1/8 turn = .00446
1/16 turn = .00223

This may help with micro adjustments. RD



____________________
“Those that beat their rifles into plow shares will plow for those who didn’t”. Jefferson

Light hunting rifles; Gravity is permanent, recoil is temporary.Your Choice


 Posted: Wed Feb 22nd, 2017 08:15 AM
   PM  Quote  Reply 
17th Post
HighBC
Full Member
 

Joined: Tue Jun 21st, 2016
Location: USA
Posts: 736
Photo: 
Are you a handloader?: Yes
Favorite type of cartridge to load?: I load everything!
My favorite chambering is:: 7mm RM
Status: 
Offline

  back to top

Those tolerances for both the new unfired brass and the once fired brass aren't bad at all IMO.

.002" for a once formed piece of brass is very good and demonstrates that the brass did form well. I wouldn't want to touch those shoulders, they only need bumping if they're uncomfortably tight when chambering.

The .004" tolerance is typical for new brass in most chambers, as factory brass and ammo are manufactured to a spec that should fit just about any chamber of the chambering.

As far the measurement taken with an empty piece of .40 or 9mm brass this number does not correlate with anything except your chamber. this is how it all fits together.

You take a piece of brass that's been formed to your chamber. Measure it then write that number down. Now use the feeler gauge to find out how much tolerance exists. So lets say for example, the piece of formed brass will just chamber with a .002" feeler gauge. Now add that .002" to the head to datum line measurement you took with the empty .40 or 9mm case, this is your zero fit spec. and should be kept in the log book. It only applies to your weapon, it won't correlate with any other rifle chamber. Now you can measure your resized brass and know just how close the head to datum line fit is to zero, thus allowing you to easily manage resizing die set up.

The piece of brass use for measurements must be the same piece. I trim it, chamfer it, and bell the mouth so it will deliver consistent measurements. Other wise the mouth won't be square, it will have inconsistencies around the mouth if you don't trim it.

HBC



 Posted: Wed Feb 22nd, 2017 06:53 PM
   PM  Quote  Reply 
18th Post
cjmcnix
Full Member


Joined: Tue Sep 27th, 2016
Location: Middletown, New Jersey USA
Posts: 64
Photo: [Download]
Are you a handloader?: Yes
Favorite type of cartridge to load?: I load everything!
My favorite chambering is:: 270 win, 6.5 Dutch, 223 Rem, 44 Mag, 45 ACP, ... ...
Status: 
Offline

  back to top

Rockydog wrote: 1. Use Big Joe's method. Load a cartridge with your favorite load Slip a very thin O ring, or even a thin rubber band used for orthodntic braces, over the case and roll it down to the rim. Insert the case and try to close the bolt. It should fit very snuggly. This will keep the firing pin from pushing the case forward away from the bolt face when it strikes the primer. Then, when the round goes off, it will expand the shoulder forward to fit the chamber instead of pushing the base back to the bolt face.
I think I'll give this method a go... #2 seems like a waste of money with the price of these bullets and #3 is a bit advanced for me at this point in my loading endeavor...

Can I assume this only has to be done once on my already loaded cases? Or do I have to do it again after I neck size and reload the first batch?



 Posted: Wed Feb 22nd, 2017 07:02 PM
   PM  Quote  Reply 
19th Post
cjmcnix
Full Member


Joined: Tue Sep 27th, 2016
Location: Middletown, New Jersey USA
Posts: 64
Photo: [Download]
Are you a handloader?: Yes
Favorite type of cartridge to load?: I load everything!
My favorite chambering is:: 270 win, 6.5 Dutch, 223 Rem, 44 Mag, 45 ACP, ... ...
Status: 
Offline

  back to top

HighBC wrote: As far the measurement taken with an empty piece of .40 or 9mm brass this number does not correlate with anything except your chamber. this is how it all fits together.
I think I'm starting to understand the purpose of that...

Since I am forming brass, does this look like the sequence I should follow on my next set of new brass?:

1. Set both of my Form dies and my final full length die so that there is a .005 gap between the shell holder and the die rim so that the cases will be long.
2. set my file trim die to normal .000 gap and trim.
3. press a bullet into the case without crimp
4. test cartridge in rifle.. if the bolt closes too easily, increase the gap on the next new brass to be formed. if the bolt won't close, pull the bullet and keep reducing the gap and running the full length sizer until it works.



 Posted: Thu Feb 23rd, 2017 03:08 AM
   PM  Quote  Reply 
20th Post
Rockydog



Joined: Tue Jul 26th, 2005
Location: 160 Miles SW Of The Frozen Tundra, Wisconsin USA
Posts: 15196
Photo: 
Are you a handloader?: Yes
Favorite type of cartridge to load?: I load everything!
My favorite chambering is:: 8mm Mauser
Status: 
Offline

  back to top

If you can make it work on the new cases slip the band over prior to chambering. You don't even need to prime the case or seat a bullet. Just size and try the chamber fit. RD



____________________
“Those that beat their rifles into plow shares will plow for those who didn’t”. Jefferson

Light hunting rifles; Gravity is permanent, recoil is temporary.Your Choice


 Current time is 01:23 PMPage:    1  2  Next Page Last Page  
Top




UltraBB 1.17 Copyright © 2007-2008 Data 1 Systems
Page processed in 0.2147 seconds (20% database + 80% PHP). 33 queries executed.