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Keeping ticks off in the Fall
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 Posted: Sun Sep 27th, 2009 05:56 AM
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Harvey57
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Hello anyone,

My son came home from a land-nav exercise.  ROTC army at Bowie State.  He has tiny ticks (nymphs I think) most every place.  I gave him the flea and tick shampoo and quarantined him (LOL).  His is eager to train for the schools "Ranger Challenge." This means more time in the woods.  I need advice to curtail this from happening again.  I want to shoot some critter in the same woods too. Many thanks.

Last edited on Sun Sep 27th, 2009 05:57 AM by Harvey57



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 Posted: Sun Sep 27th, 2009 02:41 PM
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Rockydog



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Harvey, I don't know about out there but here in WI those tiny little beggars are deer ticks. Some of them only about twice as big as the period at the end of this sentence.The bad news is that those are the ticks that carry Lyme disease. This stuff is nothing to mess around with. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lyme_disease

I've contracted this stuff as have one of my Labs. Fairly easy to control if you catch it in time.

Insect repellant with heavy amounts of DEET help. Be sure to concentrate around collars, pants cuffs, the front of shirts between buttons etc. For spring turkey hunts here a lot of guys wear camo gators over their pants cuffs. Rockydog



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 Posted: Sun Sep 27th, 2009 04:40 PM
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Charley



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Ticks of the genera Ixodes are the bad guys of the tick world in the US. This includes the deer tick, and the black legged tick. If it matters to you, check the number of legs...larval ticks have only six, and the nymphal form has eight, as do adults.

Most effective prevention is a two pronged approach, using a repellent containing DEET, and treating clothing with a repellant pesticide with a synthetic pyrethroid, such as Permethrin. Be sure whatever form of pesticide you use is labeled for such use. Most any formulation for application to clothing will carry a CAUTION signal word.

I know Cutter markets a Permethrin, and I'm sure other do as well.



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 Posted: Sun Sep 27th, 2009 08:12 PM
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Harvey57
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Thanks Guys!  My Dad had Lyme's for a year on top of Parkinson's.  It is "no B.S. bad for you."   I'll take the kid to REI for the DEET or find it on the Web.  I'll see that he treats his clothes and person next time.  He used dog flea and tick shampoo last night.  I gave him some Quell Shampoo from a case of Scabies I had.  He used that then took another shower with the dog shampoo too.



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 Posted: Sun Sep 27th, 2009 08:29 PM
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Rockydog



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Gee Harvey, Better be careful with that stuff. Full moon on Thursday, you'll have him sittin' in the back yard bayin' like crazy. RD



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 Posted: Mon Sep 28th, 2009 12:40 PM
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woodsman777



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when we were kids we would put three or four tube socks one inside another

 and then we would fill it with sulfer powder we got  from the local co-op

 then use it as a duster on  all bare skin and any openings in clothing

never got ticks or chiggers on us and it never spooked the deer

 



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 Posted: Mon Sep 28th, 2009 02:53 PM
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Harvey57
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RD, I am planning to chain myself to the casting equipment or reloading bench on Thursday.  Just until the urge to bite subsides.:wink:

Thanks for the sulfur powder idea.  I need to share these with my son.

By the way, we have to pass a qualifying shoot in order to hunt DRN land in MD.  We must place 3 out of five shots on a paper plate at 50 yds with shot gun or muzzle loader.  I took the kid (20 y/o ROTC strapper) to the range for the exam.  He puts the first one threw the 2" back center and the next two thouching 1.5" down and right.  Boom, Boom, Boom!  Hands me the 870 shotgun, collects his sufficient card, and walks towards the lunch trailer.  My fellow club members asked how he did it cold.  He said, " Dad said it was sighted in!"

I am proud.  He takes his fellow ROTC class mates to the range to get them acquainted with firearms too.

Again, thanks for the help with the critters. 

Last edited on Mon Sep 28th, 2009 02:58 PM by Harvey57



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 Posted: Sun Oct 4th, 2009 04:54 AM
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Harvey,

I use two pair of knee socks, and spray myself down with 100% Deet that I get from Cutter, but you can get 100% via the military supply/surplus chain.

Depending on what I am planning on doing, I may spray the inside of my work trousers with Regular Cutter, and then spray the outside once I put them on.

Good Luck!

Jerry



 Posted: Mon Oct 5th, 2009 10:01 AM
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Jack Hester
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My wife and I do 18th Century Living History.  Read that as primitive camping in places that most folk don't consider campsites.  Learned a long time ago that B1 vitamins are an excellent insect (all kinds, including ticks) repellent.  You body absorbs just a little, and sheds the rest out through the pores in your skin.  Insects find it very distasteful.  This doesn't mean you won't find them crawling on you.  In most cases, they don't bite, which is what it's all about.  They're still pests, when you don't want them around.

Please note: too much will make you nauseous.  I take 100 mg a day, during the insect seasons.  I've known several people who just can't take advice, and take too much (200 - 250 mg).  Some learned and dropped back to to the lower dose.  Others trash-mouthed me, and never took it again.

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 Posted: Mon Oct 5th, 2009 10:02 PM
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Charley



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I do pest management for a living, and am an Entomologist, at least according to EntSocUSA. The B1 will work for most people (depending on body chemistry), the sulphur will work, and so will the permethrin/DEET combination.

DON"T assume ANY material held against your skin is benign and will be of no consequence. Use your head, and adjust dosages CAREFULLY to achieve the desired result. When in tick territory, check yourself whenever you get the chance. Pull the SOBs off your clothing and toss them aside. Try not to rub against brush when moving. Part of the life cycle of ticks involves them climbing brush or plants near trails that mammals move on. When a mammal rubs against the plant the tick has climbed, it clings to the animal, attracted by CO2 and body heat. Unless absolutely neccesary, avoiding brush and higher plants near trails can help minimize the number of ticks you will have to deal with.



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 Posted: Mon Nov 2nd, 2009 12:39 AM
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miestro_jerry
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We had our first good freeze a couple weeks ago and it will get down below 30 again this week, so I would say the problem is minimal around here.

For the Ranger Challenge, aren't you suppose to grin and bear all of the pains that goes with the contest?

Jerry

 



 Posted: Mon Nov 2nd, 2009 02:40 AM
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fryboy
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i've seen warm winter days in late january early feb that the dogs and i both were covered in lil ticks,once it warms up they be extremely active ( read that hungry)very seldom do i kill a deer and not find it's ears infested,i try to get lots of vitamin b's and i cant always find it but there's a spray called "ultrathon" ( ok ok it also comes in creme too uugh) it's one of the best insect repellents i have found , i hate chemicals tho and prefer to use them as a last resort,i do like the clothing only stuff a bit better,the women folks swear by avon's "skin so soft",there's aways a can and a pump of 100% deet in the truck tho (dont grab u gun until it's dry tho the stuff eats some finishes)



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 Posted: Mon Nov 2nd, 2009 02:48 AM
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Charley



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Skin so Soft has a good reputation as a mosquito repellant, but from what I've seen isn't such a  good tick repellant. YMMV.

Freeze is only temporary relief, they are tough creatures. As Fryboy said, first warm day they will be moving again.



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 Posted: Mon Nov 2nd, 2009 03:22 AM
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I try to take all precaution during the season for ticks and fleas. Now that we are officially into the cold season, we may not have a decent warm up until April or May.

Last spring we had a freeze after May 15th which is suppose to be the first day for planting by the Farmer's Almanac. Right now it's 35 degrees outside.

When I lived in the city, I would still be mowing the lawn at this time of the year. Something to do with all of the asphalt and concrete or maybe the concentration of politicians.

Year round I work in the fields, so I take precautions, I hear the Marines are mixing their 100% DEET with Skin So Soft, don't know why, the DEET works for me, but I also don't take a bath in the stuff.

The first year I was here, I had a flea problem, that got cured with some bug bombs and putting that expensive stuff on the cats and dogs necks.

After being in the fields, I do check for ticks, but I also wash my exposed skin with Lye soap. Because of all the skin cancer warning from being out in the sun all day, I use SPF 80, which also may keeps the bugs away from my head, neck and fore arms.

Back when I was in the Army, we could get DDT in spray cans and that was our bug deterrent. Now we aren't suppose to use because of all of the harmful effects, it rerally wasn't that bad if used properly.

Jerry

 



 Posted: Mon Nov 2nd, 2009 08:49 PM
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Charley



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Back when I was in the Army, we could get DDT in spray cans and that was our bug deterrent. Now we aren't suppose to use because of all of the harmful effects, it rerally wasn't that bad if used properly.


Rachel Carson killed more people world wide than Adolph Hitler did. Her psuedo scientific writing led directly to the death of millons of people thru insect borne disease and famine caused by insect pests. The left thinks she is a saint ( Jimmy Carter even posthumously awarded her the Presidential Medal of Freedom). I wouldn't urinate on her grave.

She is the root cause of the demise of all chlorinated hydrocarbon pesticides in the US, and the birth of the EPA.



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 Posted: Mon Nov 2nd, 2009 10:04 PM
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DDT did more to help crop production than any other pesticide. When it came off the market and was banned world wide people started to die from starvation in record numbers.

Like with any toxic agent, don't drink or eat it in pure form.

Since the time of DDT, every almost decent pesticide has been take off the market for one reason or another. Pest control and weed control can be difficult.

Plus the government and military during WW II dusted clothing with DDT for lice control

But we have a situation that people need to have some protection from bugs that carry disease that have proven more harmful to mankind than the bug sprays from the olden days.

Jerry



 Posted: Tue Nov 3rd, 2009 02:28 AM
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Charley



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Actually, there are some great products in production and use today, that are far more specific then the chlorinated hydrocarbons, or the later organo phosphates. Trouble is, they are much more expensive, in part because a pesticide costs as much to bring to market as a drug.



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 Posted: Tue Nov 3rd, 2009 02:52 AM
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Charlie,

You are right about the cost of the new chemicals for farming. They are thru the roof. But the cost of a new tractor is out of sight, I have been looking for a used combine that needs over hauled and maybe needs some other work, they are pricey also.

People wonder why the cost of fooding going up, the cost of growing food that passes inspection by the state/fed has gone up 14% for me this last season. I am not making any more money.

I keep some land aside that chemicals are used sparingly on, it has too many weed problems, lots of insects, so in a few days, I will spray that area for weeds and in the spring figure out which pesticide I will use. I am not trying to be organic or natural on that small parcel of land, the veggies don't have to last so many days to market and then sit in bins for so many more days. I bring them up to the house and we start processing them. That is why I have a freezer full of food and about 20 cases or more stuff canned. It maybe a lean year with this administration and I like to eat once in a while.

Jerry



 Posted: Thu Nov 5th, 2009 10:31 AM
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OldStuffer



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Harvey57 wrote: RD, I am planning to chain myself to the casting equipment or reloading bench on Thursday.  Just until the urge to bite subsides.:wink:

Thanks for the sulfur powder idea.  I need to share these with my son.

By the way, we have to pass a qualifying shoot in order to hunt DRN land in MD.  We must place 3 out of five shots on a paper plate at 50 yds with shot gun or muzzle loader.  I took the kid (20 y/o ROTC strapper) to the range for the exam.  He puts the first one threw the 2" back center and the next two thouching 1.5" down and right.  Boom, Boom, Boom!  Hands me the 870 shotgun, collects his sufficient card, and walks towards the lunch trailer.  My fellow club members asked how he did it cold.  He said, " Dad said it was sighted in!"

I am proud.  He takes his fellow ROTC class mates to the range to get them acquainted with firearms too.

Again, thanks for the help with the critters. 


VERY nice Harvey, good reason to be proud. :thumbs:

 

As said on here, Uncle Sam used to have a spray of Premrethrin you dampened your clothes with, then let dry before wearing, for a 2-week repelency, I think you can find, either theirs surplus or in the Civ. version with no great troubles, and high-DEET stuff on all exposed skin.

Got to go to work now, I'll try to do some 'net looking this afternoon/evening for products.



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I don't always venture out into the sub-freezing darkness, but when I do, it is hunting season, and I carry a Browning. Stay hungry my friends.


 Posted: Thu Nov 5th, 2009 10:34 AM
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OldStuffer



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For the clothes:
http://www.caplock.com/Permethrin.htm

http://www.labsafety.com/SAWYER-Permethrin-Clothing-Treatment_24538730/

http://www.travmed.com/catalog/index.php?cPath=21_80



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I don't always venture out into the sub-freezing darkness, but when I do, it is hunting season, and I carry a Browning. Stay hungry my friends.


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