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Game meat for the table.
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 Posted: Mon Mar 28th, 2011 11:46 AM
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Aussie Mick



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For the not so initiated in "bush to table" game meat.

Would those in the know, like to give some instruction in what to look for in common game meats?

Not meant to be just a "US referance" as such, but to be honest, thats where the majority of our members live at the moment.

 

Aussie Mick



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 Posted: Thu Apr 14th, 2011 05:14 AM
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sako06

 

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One of the aggie courses I enrolled in at the University of Arizona while earning my BS in Wildlife Mgt was Parasites of Domestic Animals which covered chickens,turkys,hogs,cattle,sheep,etc. It was an interesting class with a very thick text with many photos of the various conditions and parasites, domestic or feral they have the same parasites.As I recall it was LePages text on parasites of domestic animals including birds.I still have the text as I do of all of my books from college related to my degree but won't get rid of them ,I did lend many of my tech manuals on game food habits to probation officer friends I worked with to help them locate deer & elk food plots.



 Posted: Thu Apr 14th, 2011 10:44 AM
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BEAR
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There are lots of reason for concern with diseased meats, mammals, fish, and birds. I worry most about bacteria and trichinosis. While I closely inspect most wild game I eat, unfortunately most of the bad things are not readily visible to the naked eye. Trichinosis is caused by any species of Trichinella parasite. These are roundworms and are visible in the intestines, but it is really the cysts that cause the problem. The cysts are in the muscles (like the steaks we eat) and are not readily visible to the naked eye. My hunting partner is a doctor and USDA certified meat inspector, very helpful.

Probably the best thing is to be careful if the animal is acting strange. While that sounds good, it is not often we have the opportunity to observe game for a period of time before the shot. Precautions I take are to check with the local game agency before hunting, as to what diseases are currently present in the species I’m hunting. Alaska has a nice series of color booklets on parasites. Fish, like salmon, have lots of parasites that you can actually see in the meat (worm like). I would NEVER eat raw or lightly cooked fish (sushi).

Before I cook any game I also look to the color and smell of the meat, if it has any unusually look, discoloration, mottling, or smell…I don’t eat it. Then make sure you cook it thoroughly, that is probably the best thing. Carrying a microscope is just not in the cards for most hunters.

It should go without saying, if you don’t want to eat it, don’t feed it to the dogs; for the most part dogs get the same diseases as humans.

Just some of my thoughts.

CWD and BSE are a whole bag in themselves !



 Posted: Mon Jul 11th, 2011 06:12 PM
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swampratt
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i always froze my pork for a certain length of time before cooking,,that is what i read

here is some reading.

Prevention
By Mayo Clinic staff

The best defense against trichinosis is proper food preparation. Follow these tips to avoid trichinosis:
  • Avoid undercooked pork, walrus, horse, bear or other wild-animal meat. Be sure the meat is cooked to an internal temperature of 170 F (77 C) throughout before eating it. Even though trichinella are less common in pork, it's better not to eat pork if it hasn't been cooked to this temperature.
  • Have wild-animal meat frozen or irradiated. Trichinosis can occur in any meat-eating mammal. Irradiation will kill parasites in wild-animal meat, and deep-freezing for three weeks kills trichinella in some meats. However, trichinella in bear meat does not die by freezing, even over a long period. Neither irradiation nor freezing is necessary if you ensure that the meat is thoroughly cooked.
  • Other processing methods don't kill parasites. Other methods of meat processing or preserving, such as smoking and pickling, don't kill trichinella parasites in infected meat.
  • Clean meat grinders thoroughly. If you grind your own meat, make sure the grinder is cleaned after each use.
Treatments and drugs
[url=javascript:toggleDivSlide('link_references','references');]References[/url]
  1. Parasitic roundworm diseases: Trichinosis. National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases. http://www.niaid.nih.gov/factsheets/roundwor.htm. Accessed Dec. 17, 2009.
  2. Trichinellosis. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. http://www.cdc.gov/ncidod/dpd/parasites/trichinosis/factsht_trichinosis.htm. Accessed Dec. 17, 2009.
  3. Weller PF, et al. Trichinellosis. http://www.uptodate.com/home/index.html. Accessed Dec. 17, 2009.



 Posted: Tue Jul 12th, 2011 03:46 AM
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sako06

 

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make sure the flesh is well done which kills parasites



 Posted: Sat Jul 16th, 2011 01:51 PM
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hunterfisher
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Some of those warnings say that game meat should be cooked to an internal temp of, 170*. Heck thats well done. I don't know of anyone who cooks their venison backstraps more than medium. Or deer roast above, 150*.:confused:



 Posted: Sat Jul 16th, 2011 02:01 PM
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swampratt
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I am with you on the deer..But the pork scares me,,so i freeze it to below -10 for at least month then cook it....

The only time i ever got sick from meat was an old snapping turtle i ate when i was 14..i did not cook it all the way..i later read to treat the snapping turtle like pork.

I was living in the woods by myself then and after 10 days of the high fever and well lets just say leaves aint as good at debris removal at sharmin...i gave up and went home...after the doctor visit and some antibiotics i was better in 30 hours....makes me think if i could have held on a couple more days i may have won the battle..



 Posted: Sat Jul 16th, 2011 06:54 PM
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swampshooter

 

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I'm not an expert, but have been an avid hunter and consumer of wild game for at least 5 decades+, I've always checked to make sure the animal appeared healthy, both before and after it was harvested. Always checked for excessive parasite infestation. I always examined the internal organs to make sure they appeared healthy, especially the liver.

The animal and meat are always handled like something I'm going to eat. I get it cooled out asap. Meat is always put in clean containers or butcher paper. I never throw a chunk of meat on a dirty picnic table or the bed of a truck. Any tainted meat contacted by body fluids or body waste is trimmed off and discarded as the flavor will be bad. Handling like this I've always had good flavored game meat.



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 Posted: Sat Jul 16th, 2011 09:09 PM
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RobertMT
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swampshooter wrote: I'm not an expert, but have been an avid hunter and consumer of wild game for at least 5 decades+, I've always checked to make sure the animal appeared healthy, both before and after it was harvested. Always checked for excessive parasite infestation. I always examined the internal organs to make sure they appeared healthy, especially the liver.

The animal and meat are always handled like something I'm going to eat. I get it cooled out asap. Meat is always put in clean containers or butcher paper. I never throw a chunk of meat on a dirty picnic table or the bed of a truck. Any tainted meat contacted by body fluids or body waste is trimmed off and discarded as the flavor will be bad. Handling like this I've always had good flavored game meat.


especially the liver,

I think that's where the old tradition of eating the fresh liver came from.  When you clean it, skin it and slice it, you will find anything that's wrong with it. 

I personally hate liver, but I always check it when gutting game, if it looks off, I check rest of animal real close.  I was also taught to check kidney fat, if it's lacking or off color, animal is most likely sick from something.



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 Posted: Sun Aug 14th, 2011 03:52 PM
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16gauge
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Check the liver of rabbits; if it has small white or gray lesions on it, it most likely has tularemia and should be discarded.
Also, check the muscle....tapeworm cysts can very readily be seen (they look like a pearl onion with a small pepper seed inside) in a lot of instances. Pay very close attention if the animal is loaded with fleas; they are an intermediate host for the tape worm parasite....



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 Posted: Wed Aug 17th, 2011 06:13 PM
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OldStuffer



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Trichinosis has apparently become such a non-issue in pork that the FDA has recindid it's directive to overcook all pork products to 170*F, this past spring.



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 Posted: Thu Aug 18th, 2011 11:26 AM
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Aussie Mick



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Excellent information coming through, please keep adding as you see fit, there can never be too much knowledge.

Aussie Mick



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 Posted: Thu Aug 18th, 2011 12:33 PM
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Like us an animal can get an infection. Check for wounds, cuts, etc. and make sure it is not swollen red or oozing bad smelling fluids.



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 Posted: Mon Aug 22nd, 2011 12:47 PM
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swampshooter

 

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As I understand it, trichinosis is still possible in wild game, but I'm not sure of this. It would be nice to find out for sure. For those of us who might hunt outside the USA, for sure it's a possibility. E.G. Canadian black bear.

Last edited on Mon Aug 22nd, 2011 12:50 PM by swampshooter



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 Posted: Mon Aug 22nd, 2011 09:24 PM
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Brucellosis and trichinosis are the two real leaders although I guess if you ain't careful with ticks, lyme disease is always a possibility. 

Brucellosis is a bacteria and contagious, handle infected meat and you got it.  Doesn't go away.  Also known as undulant fever because you spike a fever and then it goes away and it repeats, supposedly every afternoon.  Great stuff. 

All the state fish and game people are warning about brucellosis so, if you live in one of those areas where the disease is showing up, get smart about what it looks like and how to avoid getting contaminated. 

Trichinosis is a freaking worm egg, theoretically, cook the meat to some temperature and kill it.  Most people recover but it can kill you quick or slow.   more great stuff. 

Trichinosis is associated with carnivores because it is transferred from one host to another by eating contaminated (raw) meat.  Hah, My Uncle John used to shoot raccoons and feed em to his pigs as a Sunday delight, those 'coons disappeared faster than twinkies at Daytona.   pigs'll eat anything. 

Swampshooter has it right, black bear has a specific form of the stinking worm, be extra careful. 



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