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shot placement
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 Posted: Wed Apr 11th, 2012 05:08 PM
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BEAR
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does anyone take frontal shots? where do you hold?



 Posted: Wed Apr 11th, 2012 05:12 PM
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SavageShooter



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BEAR wrote:
does anyone take frontal shots? where do you hold?

I've always been lucky enough to get the broadside shot. But if I had a MONSTER buck that I felt like I couldn't wait to see if he'd turn for me...I think it's shoot him right at the base of the neck. (bottom part before chest)



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 Posted: Wed Apr 11th, 2012 05:20 PM
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12semi
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I have taken exactly two head on/frontal shots. 

First was with a muzzle loader, deer running right at me, I cocked the ML and the deer screeched to a halt and I took the shot.  Stood him straight up.  I was aiming at the bottom of his neck.  This was my first ML deer.

2nd deer was playing peek-a-boo with me, he kept looking around a tree at me, he had me pegged.  I got ready and coughed and he took a step towards me.  Crosshairs right at bottom of neck, where it meets the body is what I would call it.  

In both instances, the deer had me identified.  IIRC, meat waste was minimal but cleaning was much more messy.

The windage crosshair seems to "fall" right to the base of the neck, gives you something to relate to. 

 

Last edited on Wed Apr 11th, 2012 05:31 PM by 12semi



 Posted: Thu Apr 12th, 2012 01:41 AM
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OKLHUNTER
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I have seen too many deer lost because of frontal shots. I try and avoid those as much as I would gut shots. I always try for the broad side shot. They usually don't run far and I don't mind tracking. Besides, if the bullet travels far enough to get to the digestive tract, and I have seen that happen, the smell can gag a magot.



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 Posted: Mon May 7th, 2012 10:23 PM
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Westcoast_Ranger
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I take, so far as possible, a shot that is half way up the body and with the crosshairs up and down the leg or slightly behind, obviously aiming for the centre of this point if quartering. You do damage the shoulder steaks a bit but my logic is thus: I am a novice deer shooter, I do not shoot for meat but as part of our deer management plan, and there is some very thick cover where I shoot. Seems to work; nothing runs far with smashed shoulders, destroyed heart and no lungs.


The link below has some good pictures that are useful to study for reference, if people are interested:

http://www.the3dstudio.com/product_details.aspx?id_product=47524

Last edited on Mon May 7th, 2012 10:27 PM by Westcoast_Ranger



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 Posted: Mon May 7th, 2012 10:43 PM
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Plainsman
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Good pictures. Anyone who hunts should have enough respect for the critter to do some serious study of how it's made and how to make the most humane kill. Thanks for posting the URL to these. (Funny-looking antlers!)



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 Posted: Mon May 7th, 2012 11:12 PM
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Ozark Ed



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I'm with Swampshooter. The last great act of defiance of a heart or lung shot deer in the Ozarks is to run 50 to 100 yards to the bottom of the biggest hollow in the county and expire. I aim on the shoulder of whitetails. I eat what I shoot but IMO the front shoulder of an acorn browse fed deer is marginal meat at best. Besides crows gotta eat same as coyotes. I know people that carry plastic bags and pack out the heart (if it's not shot) and liver. I think I'd try fried cow manure first.



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 Posted: Tue Nov 13th, 2012 11:08 AM
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RuddyLance
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I love to hunt buffalos. As I earned through the internet, the placement changes from one animal to another animal. For buffalos, the best area is the heart and the lungs area.



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 Posted: Wed Nov 14th, 2012 02:30 AM
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olyeller
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Old thread gets new life, so I wade in here FWIW

Paul, your experience with the 130 Sierra is why I gave up on Sierras way back then too. It's the bullet though, not the calibre. Ever shoot one with a Win silvertip back then? No muss, no fuss, just a DRT deer.
Biggest mess I ever saw was a 110gr varmint bullet in the 270; but it would have been the same thing if it came out of a 270WSSM, no?
We try real hard to get our guns to shoot 1"groups at 100yds so why not neck or head shots? That's my preference, especially with smaller calibres. I've had some pretty bad luck with a variety of bullets in my 243's, so neck shots have become the norm and with a 222 or 223 its a must as far as I'm concerned.
No meat loss that way and a real clean field dressing job too.



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 Posted: Fri Nov 23rd, 2012 01:40 PM
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If I have to make a frontal shot on a whitetail I aim right at the top of the white, which is the base of the neck and about the center of the chest. Same hold on other game except you don't have the white to use for reference. I'd rather avoid a frontal shot on deer but sometimes that is the only opportunity available.



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 Posted: Thu Dec 27th, 2012 04:51 PM
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saddlesore
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Aside from the messier cleaning, there is nothing wrong with a dead center frontal shot. Most of the time the animal is stopped and staring at you. A dead center shot takes out the spine.With the advent of  the "No Gut" method of processing game, the mess encountered is not a problem.

The big problem with head shots is the fact that the animal does not bleed out.The heart is stopped immediately and all the blood is still in the arteries andviens. Making fro poorer tasting meat.In addition,missing the intended mark by 2" can lead to  a shot off jaw in which the animl dies a lingering death.

I can't fathom the reasoning that if one is hunting for meat,they place the shot so  and so, but if for horns, it is different. Pretty sorry reason for shot placement decisons. Same with the old saw"I'd rather have 1/2 a deer  tha nto lose a whole one." Pick you shots and put them in the right place and you won't incur either.



 Posted: Tue Oct 6th, 2015 02:08 AM
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Area Man
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Pecos wrote:
Jest thoutht I would put in my two cents worth. I have been hunting for almost 60 yrs and changed my shot placement about 40 yrs ago from behind the should to center of the should after I lost a nice Elk. I had an old timer tell me if ya hit them in the shoulder and break them down, the can't run or breath, so far that has worked for me.

While shot placement is like everything else, everybody has their own opinion, the above has worked for me for a long time.

There are some shots I will not even attempt, facing straight away or toward me. If the amimal I am hunting is for eating, deer, elk, etc, if they are moving faster that a walk, the get a pass for that day.

Jest my opinion.

Pecos


My first and only deer was facing me directly. My buddy shot at and missed, spooking the deer which bolted right towards me then stopped 25 yards away and looked back over his shoulder. I had never read about frontal shots and want sure if they were ok. I hesitated just a fraction of a second then figured I could hit heart our lungs so I let fly.

Deer took off. I'd been told if they run tail up you missed.

Nope. He ran maybe 25 yards and crashed to the ground like someone yanked a carpet from under him. Got out of the stand and when I walked up on him saw my arrow sticking out of his rear haunch.



 Posted: Mon Nov 30th, 2015 04:19 AM
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DPSTex
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If you shoot 'em in the upper neck, near the head, they tend not to run at all and you don't usually have to wait until they turn a certain way. The nice little round target of the upper neck is about the same size as the heart, and you don't have to guess where inside the deer's body it is and it's usually always visible.  My only worry when I take a neck shot is if their head is sideview, there is a greater chance of a windpipe shot, so I do try to avoid those.  With does, I'll often whistle at 'em to get 'em to look my way, then I'll shoot 'em in the white spot at the throat.  With the bucks, since I'm a little bit more afraid of scaring them off, I'll usually wait till I get the look I want.   I like the neck shot because usually, if you miss, you miss clean and don't hurt the deer at all, If you get a minor flesh wound, they will likely survive. Anything else, jugular, spinal cord, they either bleed like crazy, externally (instead of into the chest cavity), so you can follow it if they run, or more likely, the shock to the spine takes their wheels away. I have found that virtually any upper neck shot ( short of a tracheotomy ) puts them down due to the shock to the spine, even if it doesn't hit the cord directly, then they lay there and bleed out before they regain control of their wheels. It also doesn't take quite the horsepower of a big rifle to do it. My little 243 is all I've ever used.

  I chose this route after I made a head shot on a doe about 30 years ago. The shot was low and took out her bottom jaw. We trailed her 3/4 of a mile, never found her. No way she survived.    Even with a head shot, there are more things you can hit that won't put 'em down but will ultimately kill 'em. The upper neck has a more concentrated lethal target, with much less chance of "collateral" damage. I hunt my family's property, it's a long and narrow 75acres, and almost any deer that runs off ends up in a neighbors property, further making us want them to drop where they're shot. Except for the ones where we've missed them in the wrong direction (i.e. a neck shot that became a head shot due to deer/hunter movement/mistake) or missed outright, they have been dropping where they stand for 30 years. We have missed a few, even though we rarely have a shot over 100yds, but those that run off leave no sign of injury or blood sign at all, indicating a clean miss, which is much more tolerable than a wounded deer that never ends up in the freezer. We also ruin alot less meat with the upper neck shot. We put 10 to 15 in the freezer every year and live off of them all year long.

Kinda drove me crazy, when one of my sons took his online hunter safety course and it wouldn't accept a high neck shot as a valid kill shot.   In my opinion, it's more valid and lethal than any other tactic.  To each his own, though.....

DPSTEX



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