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How to load bottle-neck rifle ammunition
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 Posted: Sun Jan 29th, 2017 04:22 AM
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olyeller
Master Handloader


Joined: Sun Nov 22nd, 2009
Location: Just West Of Bruzdenbleedin, Texas USA
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Favorite type of cartridge to load?: rifle
My favorite chambering is:: 270Win ...
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I see many new handloaders asking the basics of reloading, and we here at Handloaders Bench don't have thread that explains the steps involved, so I took it on myself to create one.

The following is an edited version of Lyman's published reloading instructions from one of their Manuals. I've taken the liberty of changing the wording to fit our current needs and practices better. There are many sources available that have published material quite similar, so I don't think I'm stepping on any toes here.

So with no further ado, here's to all the people who are just starting this hobby.


Reloading Rifle Cartridges

The basic steps of rifle case reloading:
I.                  Case is sized to return its inside neck and outside body to factory-like dimensions. The fired primer is removed automatically during this operation.
II.                 New primer is seated
III.                Propellant powder is weighed and placed into case.
IV.                Bullet seating and crimping (when required).
 

STEP ONE SELECTING A LOAD AND COMPONENTS

At first, the selection of components may seem a difficult and confusing task. This is especially true if a general knowledge of basic ammunition details has not yet been acquired. Nonetheless, you soon will find that component selection quickly becomes an easy and fun part of reloading. The learning process can be hastened along by developing as much ammo knowledge as leisure time reading will allow. Thousands have found LYMAN'S GUIDE TO BIG GAME CARTRIDGES AND RIFLES a good book for enhancing ammo knowledge, especially with regards to bullet selection.

Selecting Cartridge Cases The selection of fired cartridge cases, or new brass, presents no special challenge. If you have saved your fired cases you need only separate them into specific groups by brand and lot number. Lot numbers appear on the factory ammo box. This number may be on an inside flap or the box back. Keeping brass segregated by lots will maximize accuracy potential and ballistic uniformity. If you purchase new unfired cases they must, of course, be of the appropriate caliber. Purchasing bulk packaged cases (in lots of 50, 100, or more) is the least expensive way of obtaining new brass.

CAUTION: Many people never load cartridge cases from an unknown source, i.e. cases picked up at the range or sold as once-fired brass. Use only brand new brass or cases obtained as the result of firing factory ammo in your firearm until you have gained sufficient experience to judge used brass.

Selecting Primers The proper primer size is listed at the beginning of the data for each cartridge, for example: large rifle, large rifle magnum, small rifle. For your first loads, we suggest you use the exact primer used for the development of the data you are following. As an alternate, match the primer brand and correct size to the brand of the case you are reloading. Do not use magnum primers unless the data specifically calls for these as doing so can alter ballistic uniformity and the safety of the data.

Do not allow cartridge nomenclature to enter into the selection of primers. For example, the 222 Remington Magnum never requires the use of a magnum primer and the 416 Rigby always requires the use of a magnum primer. Always follow the primer size and type as listed in the data tables.

Selecting Propellant Powders Propellant powders are available in many different types. The burning speed of each and the ballistics obtained can vary tremendously. Powders are designed to suit specific applications such as: bullet weight, case size and shape, pressure level and other specific ballistic and firearm needs. As a result, only certain propellants are suitable for specific applications. When selecting a powder for your first reloading efforts, we suggest the use of the propellant listed in the data you are using for the accuracy load.

CAUTION: Always start with the exact powder charge weight shown under the starting grains column. Heavier loads should not be used until the handloader has gained some experience and fully understands proper load development.

Selecting Jacketed Bullets Bullet selection may at first seem confusing. To simplify the process, select a bullet weight to duplicate the factory ammo you favor. The appropriate diameter bullet may be determined from the caliber/bullet tables in your Reloading Manual. Many calibers use the same diameter bullet. For example: 300 Savage, 30-40 Krag, 308 Winchester, 30-06 Springfield, 300 Winchester Magnum, and others, all use a .308" diameter bullet (30 caliber).

There is another consideration when selecting bullets. The muzzle velocity of a cartridge may require a specific bullet jacket strength and construction. For example, the 30 MI Carbine uses a .308" bullet; but because of its very low velocity it requires a bullet having a very soft jacket in order to properly expand. The 30-30 has a modest velocity and it also needs a relatively soft bullet, albeit stronger than those for the 30 MI Carbine. Still other calibers require a bullet designed for a mid-range velocity bullet, for example the 222 Remington. Bullets that are ideal for this cartridge often are designated with nomenclature that suggest rapid bullet expansion, for example: Blitz, Expander, Super Explosive (SX) and so on. Often bullets for specific applications will be so marked on the package. Some examples are 22 Hornet, 30-30, 32 Winchester Special.

Frequently the data specifies the bullet manufacturer's product number for each tested bullet weight. Each of the listed bullets will work fine for target shooting. However, for proper expansion on varmints or big game you will need to make certain that the bullet you select is properly designed and suitable for the velocity range of your cartridge. If you are loading for hunting, avoid the use of bullets designated as Match or Target style as these may not expand properly on game.

Often you will be able to purchase the identical bullet used in your favorite factory loads. For example, some of the data may list the Nosler Partition, Nosler Ballistic Tip, Hornady Interlock, or another bullet. Many other factory bullet types are available to the handloader and generally may be substituted as long as the Handloader maintains comparable bullet construction. I.E., substitute Brand X cup and core for another brand of cup and core, but don't substitute a monometal for a cup and core.

Other important bullet selection criteria are the possible need for a cannelure or the requirement for a blunt nosed bullet.

THE LOADING SEQUENCE

The use of two loading blocks is suggested. As each step is performed, the case should be removed from one loading block, processed, and then placed in the second loading block. This will keep the process orderly and prevent many common bench errors.

Note: It is strongly suggested the handloader follow the batch method of ammo making. That is, perform a single operation on all cases to be reloaded before proceeding to the next step.

STEP TWO CASE INSPECTION

Fired cartridge cases have a finite life. Depending upon the firearm used, caliber of the firearm, internal ballistics of the load, and other considerations, it is reasonable to expect from 2 to 15 firings from each case. Six firings are average for the typical bottleneck rifle cartridge such as the 270 Winchester or 30-06 Springfield. Belted magnum cases such as the 7mm Remington Magnum, 300 Winchester Magnum and 338 Winchester Magnum typically last for only 3 firings. Low pressure cartridges fired in strong actions, such as the 416 Rigby, generally offer the greatest number of firings. All else equal, cases fired in semiautomatic rifles will have a shorter reloading life than cases fired in bolt action rifles.

All cases reach a point when further reloading becomes unsafe. The keeping of careful reloading records and the performing of visual inspections on each case before, during, and after reloading, are essential to ensure that you use only suitably safe fired cases.

Begin your inspection by wiping each case with a cloth to remove excess fouling, dirt, and any foreign material that could scratch your resizing die or the case itself. Turn each case mouth down and tap it lightly on the bench to dislodge anything that may have entered the case after firing.

Now look for split necks or bodies, signs of incipient case separation (a bright partial or complete ring around the case at the point where the case's solid base joins the wall of the cartridge), corrosion, or burn through perforations. Also, look for any signs of gas leakage around the primer pocket. Eliminate all cases with any visual defect or abnormality. To prevent later inadvertent use of a rejected case, crimp its mouth shut with a pair of pliers before discarding it. Then place each case, mouth up, in a loading block.

STEP THREE CASE CLEANING

Case cleaning is an important step to protect your reloading dies and firearm chambers. If you also want your reloads to look like new, now is the time to put all your cases into a tumbler. Follow the instructions that come with the tumbler. After removing cases from the tumbler tap the mouth of each case on the bench to ensure that no tumbling media remains in it. Check the primer flash hole for obstruction and clean if needed. Then wipe each case lightly with a clean cloth.

STEP FOUR INSIDE NECK BRUSHING

Case neck brushing will enhance accuracy. This is a step that some handloaders omit. However, it is a simple one that takes very little time and it will improve the performance of your ammunition. Brushing the inside case neck will rid it of excess firing residue, enhance the ease of pulling the expanding button through the case neck (when withdrawing the case from the sizing die) and extend the useful life of the sizing die's expanding button. It will also enhance accuracy by helping to maintain uniform bullet pull. This operation simply involves three or four passes of a brush through the case mouth.

Place the brushed case into the second loading block, mouth down, so as to allow any loosened crud to fall free of the case. To prevent the accumulation of debris in the second loading block, many handloaders tap the case mouth on the bench before placing it in the block, mouth down.

STEP FIVE CASE LUBRICATION

When a cartridge is fired it expands. The expanded dimensions are not compatible with holding a new bullet with proper tension (bullet pull), and are not conducive to easy chambering. To avoid these, and other difficulties, all fired cases must be resized.

Roll a case lightly across your lubricant pad or spread a thin coat of Imperial Wax on each case. Do not fail to lubricate each case or it will stick solidly in the resizing die creating a very difficult to correct problem. Do not use excessive lubricant as doing so will cause cases to dent during the resizing step. Use only enough lubricant to insure the case enters and leaves the resizing die without difficulty. Be neat. Do not get lubricant into the primer pocket or case mouth unless you are going to tumble clean again after resizing.

Many handloaders like to wipe a small amount of lube inside the neck so the expander button doesn’t drag too much. If you choose to do this, be sure to clean the lubricant out before reloading the cases. You may also elect to use a dry lubricant such as graphite to lubricate the inside of the neck and expander. Lee Precision makes a case lubricant that is water soluble and does not degrade propellants.

Do not get lube on the case shoulder or it will dent, or possibly collapse, during resizing.

Dipping the case mouth in mica or another dry powder lubricant as stated above will help the expander button pass smoothly through the case neck. Place the case in the loading block mouth up.

STEP SIX CASE RESIZING & FIRED PRIMER REMOVAL

Place a lubed case into the shell holder and run the case into the full length resizing die. Follow the instructions for proper die adjustment as explained in the material supplied with your die set. After the first case is resized, wipe off the lubricant with a clean cloth or tumble clean as previously explained. Then place the case into a cartridge headspace gauge. If a die adjustment is needed, now is the time. The resizing die generally is adjusted so that the shell holder, at the top of its travel, will contact the resizing die and create a slight cam action against the die. During this operation the fired primer will automatically be ejected from the case. Withdraw the case from the sizing die and place the case into the loading block, mouth down. Visually inspect each case as it is placed in the loading block to ensure the fired primer has been removed.

Note: The decapping rod should be adjusted just low enough to ensure the primer is pushed free of the case. If the decapping rod is too low it will impact the inside bottom of the case and be damaged.

Proceed until all cases have been lubed and sized.

Note: In the past, varying sources have suggested that the primer be seated as the case is withdrawn from the resizing die. However, it is possible for case lubricant to contaminate and thus destroy primers. Therefore, we suggest that this is not the ideal time for primer seating.

Another Die Setting procedure attributed to Paul B:

The following is Paul B's method of setting a full length die to resize only enough to fit your chamber.

This is how I set up my sizing die for bottleneck cartridges.

1. Take a once fired factory round and blacken the neck and shoulders with a Magic Marker or Sharpee pen. Some people like to smoke the neck and shoulder, but I find the Magic Marker/Sharpee pen a bit better.

2. Carefully lubricate the case.

3. Loosen the lock ring on the sizing die and back off about two turns from when the die is set to touch the shell holder.

4. Size the case. Note where the marks are on the case and turn the die down about a half a turn and size again. Turn down some more, and resize again. What you are looking for is the marks on the blackening just touching the shoulder.

5. Clean the lube from the case and try it in the rifle. It may chamber just a bit on the snug side. If so, turn the die down ever so slightly, lube and size again. Wipe off the lube and try in the rifle. If it slides in as easily as a factory round, you should be good to go. If not, usually one more very slight adjustment should fix the problem.

6. Tighten the locking ring for the die and you're done. You have just set your sizing die up for a custom fit to your specific rifle, rather than a generic one size fits all guns.

Paul B.



STEP SEVEN LUBRICANT REMOVAL AND SECOND INSPECTION

Carefully wipe each case with a clean cloth so as to remove all traces of sizing lubricant. Use a clean section of the cloth for each case. You can also simply return the sized brass to the tumbler for about an hour to remove the lubricant inside and out. Next, carefully inspect the case for any flaws. Repeated case resizing and firings can cause case mouths and bodies to become brittle and split when fired or during resizing. Also watch for signs of incipient case separation.

It is a good idea at this time to drop the resized case into a cartridge headspace gauge as a worthwhile inspection step. This will ensure that your sizing die is correctly adjusted to give the case the proper headspace length. Place cleaned and inspected cases in your loading block, mouth up. Should you find any defects, this is the time to discard the entire lot of cases.

SPECIAL STEP FOR STRAIGHT CASES (i.e. 444 Marlin, 45-70, 458 Win. Mag.) OR FOR WHEN USING LEAD BULLETS:

Straight cases cannot be properly neck expanded in a resizing die. Such cases must now be expanded in a special expanding die such as the Lyman M die. This extra die is supplied in all appropriate caliber die sets. If you wish to load lead bullets, the case mouth must have a two step expansion. This is also done with a M die. Follow the instructions that come with all 3 die straight case sets or with the M die when purchased as an accessory for loading lead bullets into bottleneck cases.

STEP EIGHT CASE LENGTH MEASURING

Case measuring is an important step both for safety and proper ammunition functioning. Cases stretch when fired and during the resizing step. If they become too long they will be difficult, if not impossible, to chamber. Excessive chamber pressure can also be caused by exceeding maximum case length. Therefore, each case must be carefully measured at this point. A dial indicating or digital caliper is the best tool for this process.

The data section drawing for each cartridge clearly indicates the maximum allowable length for the resized case. If one or more cases are found to be at maximum or greater length, trim all cases to a uniform length as described in the next step.

STEP NINE CASE TRIMMING AND DEBURRING

As stated previously, cases must be trimmed when they exceed maximum allowable length. Additionally, case trimming is recommended whenever starting to load new or once fired brass as such cases will not be of a uniform length. Trimming cases to a uniform length will enhance accuracy and ballistic uniformity.

Note: if you will be crimping cases to bullets (required for ammo to be used in semi-automatic and pump action rifles, or for ammo to be used in tubular magazines), the crimping process will be less than satisfactory if cases are not of a uniform length. Many reloaders, who crimp cases, trim after every firing/resizing cycle.

The proper trim-to length for cases is clearly shown in the data for each cartridge. Adjust your trimmer according to the manufacturer's instructions. When trimming, allow for some dwell time - that is for a number of rotations of the cutter after the case has been trimmed to length. This will help ensure the maximum uniformity of finished lengths.

After trimming, remove the burrs (formed by the trimmer cutter) from both the inside and outside of the case mouth using a deburring tool. A few twists of the tool is all that is needed. Do not deburr the case to a sharp edge. Tap the case mouth on the bench to dislodge any brass chips from inside the case. Place the case, mouth down, in your loading block.

CAUTION: The material trimmed from a case flows from the junction of the case head and wall. As brass continues to flow and is trimmed away, this section of the case becomes thinner until it reaches a point where the case is severely weakened. Therefore, never trim a case more than four times (keep careful records). When a case needs its fifth trimming it must be discarded.

Note: The initial trim of new cases is not counted when determining the number of times a case is trimmed as this trim is done not because of case stretch but rather to create a uniform length.
 

STEP TEN PRIMER SEATING

While not absolutely essential, it is advisable to clean primer pockets before seating a new primer. This is a simple operation requiring only a few twists of the pocket cleaning tool. As each case's primer pocket is cleaned, place the case in the loading block, mouth up.
 
Bring a box of 100 primers to the bench and read the label aloud to ensure that you have the correct brand and size. Then double check again. You must use the primer size and type called for in the data. It’s important to wash and thoroughly dry your hands before starting to prime.

Place a quantity of primers (never more than 100 - or a lesser amount as needed) onto a primer flipper tray. Gently rotate the primer tray until all primers are anvil side up.

CAUTION: Safety glasses should be worn whenever handling primers.

Primer seating may be accomplished in many ways and with differing tools. One of the best methods is to use a press-mounted unit at the reloading tool's sizing die station. Most loading tools come equipped with a basic primer seating tool that primes the case at the normal shell holder position. Follow the instructions supplied with the tool. Place a primer, anvil up, into the priming post, push the post under the shell holder, and then lower the shell holder over the post to seat the primer. On many loading tools, this requires a "feel" method to seat the primer to the correct depth. Some tools will have a rudimentary stop to adjust primer seating depth.

Generally, primers should be seated 0.003" to 0.005" below flush of the case head - a nominal of 0.004" below flush.

CAUTION: Primers seated too high (above flush) are a needless hazard. It is possible that such primers can be ignited before the firearm action is closed, causing a serious accident. High primers are also prone to misfires. Primers seated too deeply (below flush) can become erratic in performance or misfire.

CAUTION: Primers are explosive and require special care in storage and handling.

Place the primed case in the loading block mouth down. When all cases have been primed, verify proper priming depth by running a finger over each case head. The novice should use a caliper to verify proper primer seating depth and then run a finger over several of these. This will teach the correct "feel" so that you can verify all remaining seating depths by "feel". After you check primer depth, return the case, mouth up, to the loading block.

After priming, return any unused primers to their original container and replace them in your storage area.

STEP ELEVEN WEIGHING POWDER AND CHARGING

Weighing powder must be done with great care and accuracy. Set up your powder scale carefully, following the instructions supplied with it. It is good practice to verify the scale's accuracy by using a weight check set. Bring only one powder can to the loading bench. Read the label aloud. You must use the exact powder called for in the data. Then double check again. The inadvertent use of the wrong powder can cause a catastrophic accident.

Bring a box of bullets to the loading bench and read aloud the label on your bullet box to make certain the bullets are the correct weight (matched to the data you are using). Then measure the diameter and weigh a few bullets to be certain that what is in the box is the same as the label. Factory packaging errors have occurred. (A bullet will be seating immediately after a case is charged with powder.)

Pour some powder into the powder trickler and position the trickler alongside the scale pan. Also pour some powder into an open container (or preferably into a powder measure). Use a scoop of appropriate size to place a quantity of powder, somewhat less than a full charge, onto the scale pan.

Note: A handy powder scoop can be made by cutting off a fired case at an appropriate length and twisting a wire handle into the case rim's undercut. Straight cases such as the 30 MI Carbine, 44 Magnum and 45-70 make the best scoops.

If using a powder measure, adjust the measure to dispense somewhat less powder than you require. The metered charge will vary so be certain that the heaviest charges will not exceed the desired weight. (It is nettlesome to try to remove excess powder from the scale pan.) Some dispense a metered charge directly onto the scale pan and then place the pan on the scale hanger, while others of us dispense into an empty prescription bottle and then dump the powder into the scale pan. Powder coming from the measure may flow over the edge of the pan if dumped directly into it from the measure, while the prescription bottle will contain it nicely.

Bring the scale into perfect balance, using the powder trickler to add one kernel of powder at a time to the scale pan. Now pour the weighed powder charge into a case using a powder funnel.

CAUTION: Make certain scale poises are not inadvertently moved during the loading process.

CAUTION: Powder is highly flammable and requires care in storage and handling. Be certain to read and follow the cautions on the container.

CAUTION: Lab technicians have observed a potential serious phenomena involving mechanical powder scales, plastic loading blocks, Styrofoam packaging and other objects made of plastic. These materials sometimes retain a static electric charge, enough to create an electrostatic field of varying radii.

This electrostatic field has proven capable of causing radical defection of uncharged and zeroed scales. Depending upon circumstances, powder in the scale pan tends to dampen the amount of deflection by varying degrees.

The loading bench should be cleared before setting up the scale. Then replace equipment one piece at a time while observing the scale pointer. Any item that causes a scale deflection should be removed from the loading bench. Do this at every loading session.

Novices should avoid the use of compressed powder charges (where the powder level in the case is so high as to require compression of the powder in order to seat a bullet to the correct depth).

NOTES ON USING A POWDER MEASURE

We have instructed that after metering a powder charge, it be checked and brought into perfect balance using a scale and powder trickler. If you are loading ammunition for a non-critical application, in order to save time you may opt to pour a metered powder charge directly into a case (without the scale check and trickler balance).

CAUTION: This method should never be used with maximum loads or by novices at any time.

When using a powder measure in this manner, ALWAYS check at least every tenth load on the scale to ensure that the measure has not gone out of adjustment and that you are using a uniform metering technique. Keep in mind that fine (small) grain or spherical powders lend themselves to more uniform metering as opposed to course (large) grain propellants. Be sure you are capable of metering uniform charges before using this method. Verify your uniformity by weighing 20 or more consecutive metered charges.

STEP TWELVE BULLET SEATING AND CRIMPING

Next, immediately transfer the charged case to the loading tool and seat a bullet to the correct over-all length. Follow the die manufacturer's instructions to properly seat the bullet to the correct depth. The maximum overall length for a loaded round is clearly listed in the data for each cartridge. Depending upon the bullet and equipment used, the finished individual overall cartridge length may vary by plus or minus 0.015".

Note: Generally, bullets should be seated to the overall length shown at the top of each data panel.

Do check to see that ammo so assembled will feed through the magazine of your rifle and that it chambers properly. (CAUTION: Do this testing out of doors with the muzzle pointed at a safe backstop.) Better yet, make a dummy round (no powder or primer) to check overall length. Circumstances, which include magazine length, chamber dimensions and bullet ogive, may make it necessary to use a different length. When all cases are charged and bullets seated, return all powder (from trickler, open container or powder measure) to the original container and return the container to its remote storage area.

Bullet crimping is required whenever there is a possibility of the bullet striking a firearm surface (during the feed/chamber cycle) with sufficient force to push the bullet deeper into the case. This means that ammunition for almost all semi-automatic and pump actions should have the case crimped to the bullet. Also, if there is a danger of the bullet creeping forward out of the case (loads with very heavy recoil) while in the magazine, ammunition should be crimped. All ammunition to be used in tubular magazines also must be crimped to prevent bullets from being driven deeper into the case during recoil. All ammo to be used in a revolver should be crimped. Because crimping sometimes has a detrimental effect on accuracy, crimping should be limited to ammo intended for one or more of the just mentioned applications.

Keep in mind that your bullets must have a cannelure (a groove around the bullet) in order to crimp. Such bullets must first be seated to a depth that will align the case mouth with the center of the bullet cannelure. Adjusting your seating/crimping die requires that you first back off the bullet seating screw substantially. Then, screw the die down far enough to turn the case mouth slightly inward into the bullet cannelure when the loaded round is fully raised into the die. Be certain the bullet seating screw is backed off far enough to prevent it from touching the bullet.

Note: Lee Precision makes the Factory Crimp Die which can crimp case necks to a bullet with no cannelure. The novice is advised to gain experience before venturing into advanced methods such as crimping this way.

Note: Crimping loads with compressed powder charges will require extra care. As stated, to do away with the need to constantly re-adjust the bullet seat/crimp die, most reloaders purchase an extra die body.

Note: The crimping operation may be combined with bullet seating, but the best results are obtained when it is done as a separate operation.

STEP THIRTEEN FINAL INSPECTION

The final inspection should be done with great care. Start by looking for imperfections. These may include, but are not limited to: case necks which split during bullet seating, and case shoulders which buckle during crimping (most often due to a poor bullet cannelure or improper die adjustment).

A second check of primer depth should be made by running your finger over each case head.

Dropping the loaded round into a case headspace gauge is also recommended to help ensure it will chamber properly. Also, measure a sampling of the loaded rounds to check for proper over-all length. Should any round be found abnormal, discard it in a safe manner or break it down and reuse the components.

Place loaded rounds into a suitable container. Clearly mark the container with: date loaded; primer used; times trimmed; powder and charge; bullet brand, weight and type, and overall ammo length. Then, enter all this information into your reloading log. Your log should also include the lot numbers of all the components used.

As stated the foregoing outlines the basic steps to assemble bottleneck, jacketed bullet ammunition; but there are many other requirements that must be observed. BE SURE TO READ ALL OTHER PERTINENT RELOADING INFORMATION YOU HAVE ACCESS TO BEFORE ATTEMPTING TO RELOAD AMMUNITION.



____________________
"Wimachtendienk, Wingolauchsik, Witahemui”

He who knows not and knows not that he knows not, is a fool.
He who knows not and knows he knows not is wise.


 Posted: Sun Jan 29th, 2017 12:57 PM
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2nd Post
HighBC
Full Member
 

Joined: Tue Jun 21st, 2016
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This should be made a sticky.

Very nice layout and easy to follow. It covers fail safe procedures such as batch loading, case inspections, and proper handling procedures of components.

Thank you Olyeller for your dedicated effort to help the new folks understand the text book fundamentals of the process, nice work my friend.

The down side, you're going to have to live with the fact that the number of "Reloader Anonymous" members attending meetings will no doubt increase. Hello, my name is -----, and I'm a reloading addict.

HBC

Last edited on Sun Jan 29th, 2017 01:04 PM by HighBC



 Posted: Sun Jan 29th, 2017 01:07 PM
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olyeller
Master Handloader


Joined: Sun Nov 22nd, 2009
Location: Just West Of Bruzdenbleedin, Texas USA
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My favorite chambering is:: 270Win ...
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HighBC said:
The down side, you're going to have to live with the fact that the number of "Reloader Anonymous" members attending meetings will no doubt increase. Hello, my name is -----, and I'm a reloading addict.
Now that's an Up Side, a good thing:wink:. They can take it to the next level and let us Old Pharts just go shoot.:lol:



____________________
"Wimachtendienk, Wingolauchsik, Witahemui”

He who knows not and knows not that he knows not, is a fool.
He who knows not and knows he knows not is wise.


 Posted: Sun Jan 29th, 2017 02:49 PM
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4th Post
Ozark Ed



Joined: Mon Jan 30th, 2012
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HighBC wrote:
The down side, you're going to have to live with the fact that the number of "Reloader Anonymous" members attending meetings will no doubt increase. Hello, my name is -----, and I'm a reloading addict.

I don't know, when I see it all laid out like that it looks like too much work :wink:. Who knew hand loading was more than just cramming some powder into any old case and capping it with a bullet? :lol:



____________________
If it weren't for double standards, liberals wouldn't have any standards at all.

"Ammo and really good friends are hard to find in a gunfight so I bring them with me." E. J. Owens


 Posted: Sun Jan 29th, 2017 04:08 PM
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Charley



Joined: Fri Sep 9th, 2005
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Glad you went to the work of putting it up!



____________________
"The fact that guns can kill another human being is the whole point. That's why they are so darn good at deterring violent criminals". Ann Coulter


 Posted: Sun Jan 29th, 2017 04:11 PM
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swampratt
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Man that is a lot of typing..You must be good at that also.



 Posted: Sun Jan 29th, 2017 05:24 PM
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golong
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Ozark Ed wrote:
Who knew hand loading was more than just cramming some powder into any old case and capping it with a bullet?

:confused:

You make it sound like dumping powder in the shell and then tapping the bullet in with a tack hammer is bad idea.



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 Posted: Sun Jan 29th, 2017 06:28 PM
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Snuffy
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Wow! This kind of stuff is what makes this site so great!

That had to take a little time to put together. Thanks olyeller!:thumbs:



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 Posted: Sun Jan 29th, 2017 06:45 PM
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olyeller
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I'm a closet proponent of the Tack Hammer Method:lol::lol:

Just hope this helps some people out.



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 Posted: Sun Jan 29th, 2017 07:24 PM
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golong
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olyeller wrote:
I'm a closet proponent of the Tack Hammer Method:lol::lol:

Just hope this helps some people out.


No doubt will. I was very happy to read it and find that after all these years I am not missing any steps! Will teach some, and bring confidence to others. :thumbs:



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 Posted: Thu Feb 2nd, 2017 05:15 PM
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STIHL
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Two very nice posts yeller glad you took the time to do it.



 Posted: Wed Mar 29th, 2017 07:04 PM
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Camohunter
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I am curious how loads get developed that are "outside" the book.
Like the use of a magnum primer on a load when the book says to use regular primer. If someone is successful with this change does it mean it is a safe load to produce?

Camo



 Posted: Wed Mar 29th, 2017 08:01 PM
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olyeller
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Camohunter wrote: I am curious how loads get developed that are "outside" the book.
Like the use of a magnum primer on a load when the book says to use regular primer. If someone is successful with this change does it mean it is a safe load to produce?

Camo

Hello Camohunter, and welcome to the Bench.
Time to get out the adult underwear, 'cause it "depends".

Depends just how far "outside" the book you are talking about. Your example is pretty common and benign. Nearly all "recommendations for good loading practices" state you should reduce your load by (typically) 10% and work back up when changing any component of the load. Remember, change only one thing at a time, reduce and work back up to an acceptable load.

So in your example, let's say your pet load for a 7.62MM Shutzenboomer loaded with a 165gr Hornaspeer PSP bullet is 60gr of Thor's Hammer 1234 powder, all held in place by a Winnington case and lit off with a WhizBang Standard LR primer. You find you are out of WhizBang Standard LR primers, but you can get GollyGee Magnum LR primer at your nearby LGS. What do you do?
Go buy them, reduce your load to 54gr of Thor's Hammer 1234 powder and do your load workup as needed to find the sweet spot for this combination of components.

Now, if you want to use a powder that is not listed anywhere, chances are it's not suitable for use in your caliber, or at least with your chosen bullet weight. So here you would need to not try such a gamble or contact the Powder Manufacturer for advice.

If someone is successful with this change does it mean it is a safe load to produce?
Only in the firearm the load was worked up for. I.E., if one of us posts a favorite load and you want to try it in your firearm, then reduce that load by 10% and work back up, watching for signs of pressure and seeking best accuracy.

Now, please take a minute and introduce yourself here:

Welcome New Members



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 Posted: Wed Mar 29th, 2017 09:38 PM
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Camohunter
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Olyeller,

Thank make perfect sense, thank you.
I have been reloading for 4-5 years but have not varied from the book recipe on any of my loads. I got a recommendation from someone in a caliber that I was interested in that used a different primer. ( magnum vs standard)
I do always start my loads and the bottom anyway and work up looking for pressure signs. I don't push the limits on any load and am looking for accuracy most of all.

I appreciate your feedback.

Camo



 Posted: Wed Mar 29th, 2017 11:33 PM
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RobertMT
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Good post for sticky, I can't believe, I didn't see it before now.

Thanks for the hard work, a suggestion, maybe Paul B, could add his die adjustment post, as it's very well laid out and would help out those just getting ready to run.



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 Posted: Thu Mar 30th, 2017 03:24 AM
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olyeller
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Good idea Robert. Let's see if he will bite; if not we'll PM him:lol:



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 Posted: Mon Apr 10th, 2017 03:22 AM
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Paul B
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This is how I set up my sizing die for bottleneck cartridges.

1. Take a once fired factory round and blacken the neck and shoulders with a Magic Marker or Sharpee pen. Some people like to smoke the neck and shoulder, but I find the Magic Marker/Sharpee pen a bit better.

2. Carefully lubricate the case.

3. Loosen the lock ring on the sizing die and back off about two turns from when the die is set to touch the shell holder.

4. Size the case. Note where the marks are on the case and turn the die down about a half a turn and size again. Turn down some more, and resize again. What you are looking for is the marks on the blackening just touching the shoulder.

5. Clean the lube from the case and try it in the rifle. It may chamber just a bit on the snug side. If so, turn the die down ever so slightly, lube and size again. Wipe off the lube and try in the rifle. If it slides in as easily as a factory round, you should be good to go. If not, usually one more very slight adjustment should fix the problem.

6. Tighten the locking ring for the die and you're done. You have just set your sizing die up for a custom fit to your specific rifle, rather than a generic one size fits all guns.

Paul B.



 Posted: Mon Apr 10th, 2017 12:52 PM
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olyeller
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Thanks Paul :thumbs::thumbs:



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 Posted: Mon Apr 10th, 2017 01:03 PM
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olyeller
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Maybe one of the Mods or Admins can add this between step six and Step seven in my original post:

STEP SIX A, Die Set-up to fit your Chamber


The following is Paul B's method of setting a full length die to resize only enough to fit your chamber.

This is how I set up my sizing die for bottleneck cartridges.

1. Take a once fired factory round and blacken the neck and shoulders with a Magic Marker or Sharpee pen. Some people like to smoke the neck and shoulder, but I find the Magic Marker/Sharpee pen a bit better.

2. Carefully lubricate the case.

3. Loosen the lock ring on the sizing die and back off about two turns from when the die is set to touch the shell holder.

4. Size the case. Note where the marks are on the case and turn the die down about a half a turn and size again. Turn down some more, and resize again. What you are looking for is the marks on the blackening just touching the shoulder.

5. Clean the lube from the case and try it in the rifle. It may chamber just a bit on the snug side. If so, turn the die down ever so slightly, lube and size again. Wipe off the lube and try in the rifle. If it slides in as easily as a factory round, you should be good to go. If not, usually one more very slight adjustment should fix the problem.

6. Tighten the locking ring for the die and you're done. You have just set your sizing die up for a custom fit to your specific rifle, rather than a generic one size fits all guns.

Paul B.



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